Teaching as a Design Science: Building Pedagogical Patterns for Learning and Technology, Diana Laurillard

By Keys, Roberta | Teaching Business & Economics, Autumn 2012 | Go to article overview

Teaching as a Design Science: Building Pedagogical Patterns for Learning and Technology, Diana Laurillard


Keys, Roberta, Teaching Business & Economics


PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Teaching as a Design Science: Building Pedagogical Patterns for Learning and Technology, Diana Laurillard, Routledge, 2012, £22.99, ISBN 978 0 41580 387 8

Throw your pens and file paper out of the window. You've got to have a Departmental Facebook page and teach all your Economics lessons using an lpad. Mark all your pupil's essays online. You 'have' to have a smart board. What do you mean, you're not using Twitter? And you haven't thrown all your hard copy textbooks out and bought your department e-books and Kindles? The question is, does all this new technology really enhance learning? As a classroom practitioner I am now starting to question: are we embracing this digital age in an effective manner in our teaching? Or, are we moving away from a classroom that is centered on teaching and learning to create a more entertaining 'drag and drop' culture?

There is little doubt the profession of teaching is changing; always has and always will. Every day, teachers across the country design and test new ways of teaching, using learning technology to help their students. Sadly, their discoveries often remain local. By representing and communicating their best ideas as structured pedagogical patterns, teachers could develop this vital professional knowledge collectively. Teachers increasingly understand that the only way to enjoy their chosen profession is to work collaboratively, sharing their expertise in learning design and incorporating the best use of available learning technologies in their day-to-day work. What exactly is meant by learning design and how you arrive at the best use of the available learning technologies is thoroughly explored in this book.

Teaching as a Design Science is broken into twelve chapters, ranging from 'What is formal learning' and 'Learning through acquisition' to 'Learning through collaboration' and 'Teaching as developing pedagogical patterns'. The book covers a wide range of learning styles in an applied context, using ICT. If you attended the recent EBEA conference, and enjoyed the session entitled 'Enquiry Based Learning: the path to more challenging and creative curricula' by Professor David Leat (Executive Director of the Research Centre for Learning and Teaching, Newcastle University), you may enjoy some reflection on Chapter 8, 'Learning through Enquiry'. …

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