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Study of Students May Not Be Applicable

Bias Found Against Unemployed" (January, "Executive Briefing") begins with a single sentence about how the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission began investigating employers' refusal to hire unemployed applicants in 2011 and then begins describing a study that purports to have empirical evidence of bias against unemployed job candidates.

Was the study related to the EEOC's investigation? The way it is presented, we are leftto assume it was.

At the end of the article, it is revealed that the study involved 270 college students rather than employers. So I guess we have evidence that college students have a bias against the unemployed. This little detail should probably have been included nearer the beginning of the section. Plus, I would have liked to have had the study cited so that one could possibly have found further information.

Nathan Hayes

Kingsport, Tenn.

Editor's Note: The study has not been published, but it has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Applied Business Research. It cites the EEOC investigation only for background context. Ted Shore, professor of management at California State University-San Marcos, who conducted the study, responds: "Our sample had an average of four years of full-time work experience (mean age of 26). I agree it's not the same as highly experienced workers, but that is always an issue in using college students in applied research. There are numerous published studies on performance appraisal using college students (I myself have published several). …

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