Culture Diversity and Elder Abuse: Implications for Research, Education, and Policy

By Dong, XinQi | Generations, Fall 2012 | Go to article overview

Culture Diversity and Elder Abuse: Implications for Research, Education, and Policy


Dong, XinQi, Generations


Elder abuse is a pervasive public health issue-a challenge that cries out for culturally appropriate training and education to enable practice and policy changes that will best protect our increasingly diverse aging population.

Elder abuse is a substantial global public health issue. The World Health Organization has declared that elder abuse is a violation of one of a human being's most basic fundamental rights: the right to be safe and free of violence (World Health Organization, 2002). In the United States, an estimated 10 percent of elders experience abuse each year, and many of them experience it in multiple forms (Beach et al., 2010; Acierno et al., 2010). In addition, elder abuse is associated with increased risk of premature morbidity and mortality (Dong et al., 2009; Dong et al., 2011a; Dong, Simon, and Evans, 2011; Dong et al., 2011c). Despite the accessibility of Adult Protective Services (APS) and nursing home regulations in all fifty states, an overwhelming number of abused older adults pass through our healthcare system undetected and untreated.

A major complexity in advancing the field of elder abuse is exemplified by the issues of cultural diversity surrounding elder abuse. In 2003, the National Research Council put forth a strong recommendation to urge the field to explore cultural issues related to elder abuse. In 2010, the National Academy of Sciences and the National Institute on Aging organized a state-ofscience meeting on research issues in elder mistreatment and financial fraud, including discussion of cultural diversity (The National Academies Committee on National Statistics, 2010). Despite these reports and the continued effort of multiple disciplines across academic, community, state, and federal organizations, there remain vast gaps in our understanding of cultural issues in elder abuse.

In the United States, the aging population (ages 65 and older) represents approximately 40 million (12.9 percent) of the population; by 2030, there will be about 72.1 million older people, more than twice the number in 2000. In 2010, approximately 20 percent of people ages 65 and older were minorities; 8.4 percent were African American; 6.9 percent were of Hispanic origin; 3.5 percent were Asian or Pacific Islander; and 1 percent were American Indian or Native Alaskan (Administration on Aging, 2012).

Recent studies have expanded our knowledge about elder abuse in African American, Latino, Korean, Indian, Native American, and Chinese populations. However, we need more studies to fill in the large gaps in our knowledge. We need quantitative and qualitative studies to better define the concept and cultural variations in the construct, definition, and understanding of elder abuse; and we need cultural explorations to better study the barriers to reporting elder abuse and help-seeking behaviors with respect to the specific sociocultural contexts. Studies also are needed to understand the prevalence, incidence, risk/protective factors, and consequences associated with incident cases of elder abuse and its subtypes in diverse populations. And we must have research to explore the issues of cultural norms and cultural expectations in relation to the perception, determinants, and impact of elder abuse in different racial and ethnic communities.

A Call for Community-Based Participatory Research

Significant challenges exist in the preparation and conduct of aging research in minority communities, especially regarding culturally sensitive issues such as elder abuse. A communitybased participatory research (CBPR) approach could be a potential model for exploring the issues of elder abuse in minority communities.

CBPR necessitates equal partnership between academic institutions with community organizations and key stakeholders to examine the relevant issues. This partnership requires reciprocal transfer of expertise and needs to build infrastructure toward sustainability. Recent elder abuse research in the Native American and Chinese communities has demonstrated success and has enhanced infrastructure and networks for community-engaged research and community-academic partnerships (Dong et al. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Culture Diversity and Elder Abuse: Implications for Research, Education, and Policy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.