Taking Action against EAB

American Forests, Winter 2013 | Go to article overview

Taking Action against EAB


If you are wondering what can be done about this threat to the environment, you are not alone. As emerald ash borer spreads across the United States, concerned communities, experts and policymakers are looking to educate and take action. The most effective and influential protection efforts have been seen at the community level.

One program that targets small communities and neighborhoods is Neighbors Against Bad Bugs (NABB) in Indianapolis. Born out of Purdue University, NABB pairs Purdue Master Gardeners, neighborhood associations, county extension educators and concerned citizens. Together, they work to educate the public and use their cooperation to save trees while keeping communities safe. This program was implemented in Indianapolis' King Park neighborhood during fall 2011. Citizens developed the Ash Borer Action Team (ABATe) and began by surveying ash trees and available planting spaces. Through a combination of treatment, removal and new plantings, the team was able to help preserve the aesthetic beauty of the King Park neighborhood. The NABB program is only one example of community efforts to address the EAB issue, though.

Through the Cooperative Emerald Ash Borer Program - a cooperative of Midwestern universities - and the United States Department of Agriculture, several resources have been made available to those who want to protect against the spread of EAB. One activity that has been of growing concern for many regions is firewood transportation. For decades, this raw product has been moved throughout the country, with little regard for what may be living inside. The cooperative has compiled maps and policies developed by 15 states, from Minnesota in the west to New York in the east, in order to protect against the spread of EAB.

Individual states are also releasing prescriptive information for proactive community members wanting to get involved. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Taking Action against EAB
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.