African American Nurse Faculty Satisfaction and Scholarly Productivity at Predominantly White and Historically Black Colleges and Universities

By McNeal, Gloria J. | ABNF Journal, January/February 2003 | Go to article overview

African American Nurse Faculty Satisfaction and Scholarly Productivity at Predominantly White and Historically Black Colleges and Universities


McNeal, Gloria J., ABNF Journal


Abstract: The aim of this study was to examine faculty satisfaction and the relationships among selected elements of African American women nurse faculty productivity at two types of institutions: predominantly white (PWCUs) and historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs). Oganizational Culture Theory was used as the conceptual framework to provide the basis to explore the extent of productivity and levels of satisfaction among the study participants. Satisfaction was measured using a six-point Likert attitudinal scale. Scholarly Productivity was measured as the extent of published/submitted works (authorship), number and dollar amounts of grant submissions (grantsmanship) and elected/appointed positions held in professional organizations (leadership). Consistent with previous research studies of minority faculty in other disciplines, the current study found that the majority, of African American women nurse faculty tended not to hold senior professorial rank, administrative positions, or tenure status. When comparisons were made between HBCU and PWCU faculty, however, a higher percentage of HBCU faculty reported holding deanships or program coordinator positions and, on average, had slightly larger dollar amounts for funded grant awards and held significantly more leadership positions in professional nursing organizations.

The aggregated data findings of this study did not support a strong relationship between selected elements of satisfaction with the academic institution's organizational culture and the scholarly productivity of African American women nurse faculty teaching at HBCUs and PWCUs. However, when the data were disaggregated by type school, moderately significant differences between HBCU and PWCU faculty were found, such that along several dimensions of the constructs of organizational culture the levels of dissatisfaction among PWCU faculty significantly skewed the overall data findings. In general, while PWCU faculty demonstrated higher levels of authorship, reported larger

salaries, and held more tenured positions when compared with HBCU faculty, PWCU respondents tended to be significantly less satisfied with the leadership, environment, and socialization processes of their respective collegiate schools of nursing than were their HBCU counterparts. Among HBCU faculty the extent of productivity positively correlated with satisfaction for three of the six dimensions of organizational culture.

Keywords: Productivity, Satisfaction, African American, Minority, Women, Faculty, Organizational Culture

The underrepresentation of minority faculty and their scholarly productivity has been a long-standing problem in the academy. Over the past two decades research initiatives have sought to investigate the derivation of the problem both outside of (Harris, 1995; Kulis, 1992; Palepu, Carr, Friedman, Ash, et al, 2000; Thomas & Asunka, 1995; Tobin, 1981; Trower & Chait, 2002; Wong, Bigby, Kleinpeter, Mitchell, et al. 2001) and within the discipline of nursing (Buerhaus & Auerbach, 1999; Davidhizar & Giger, 1999; Giger, Fishman, Johnson, Davidhizer,et al 1992; Giger,Johnson, Davidhizer, & Fishman, 1993; McNeal, 2000). While African American nurse faculty constitute nearly 6% of the nursing professoriate, fewer than 900 persons comprise this aggregate, (Louden, 1996) producing a yield of less than one faculty member per school of nursing, if the population were evenly distributed. Further, among the nations more than 1500 schools of nursing, less than 30 nursing programs are located on the campuses of historically black colleges and universities (Carnegie, 1995), where nearly half of all minority faculty are employed (Trower & Chait, 2002; USDOE, 1996).

While there has been an increase in the overall numbers of minority faculty teaching at the nation's institutions of higher education, the greatest percent increase has been noted among Asian American faculty, from 2. …

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