Performance Stylistics: Deleuze and Guattari, Poetry and (Corpus) Linguistics

By O'Halloran, Kieran | International Journal of English Studies, July 1, 2012 | Go to article overview

Performance Stylistics: Deleuze and Guattari, Poetry and (Corpus) Linguistics


O'Halloran, Kieran, International Journal of English Studies


ABSTRACT

Taking as stimulus some key ideas of the French philosopher, Gilles Deleuze, and his collaborator the psychoanalyst, Félix Guattari, I demonstrate an alternative interpretative engagement with poetry. In this approach, a poem is seen as an invitation to the reader to be creative via a web-based, interpretative journey which is individual, edifying and refreshing. This approach allows a poem's obliqueness and suggestiveness to trigger, randomly, knowledge and resources on the world-wide-web that are new for the reader; in turn, these can be used as fresh perspectives on the poem in order to perform it in individual ways, to 'fill in' creatively personas and scenarios in the poem. This web-based engagement with a poem involves stylistic analysis.

The web-based element of performance stylistics is centrifugal, taking the reader outside of the poem, travelling from website to website. This centrifugal movement is balanced by a centripetal one which takes the reader into the patterns of the poem. Stylistic analysis meets this centripetal need effectively. Traditionally, stylistic analysis has been used to provide linguistic evidence for interpretation of a literary work. However, influenced by ideas in the work of Deleuze and Guattari, I also use stylistic analysis in a non-traditional way - to mobilise interpretation of a poem. In this article, the poem I use to demonstrate performance stylistics is Robert Frost's, 'Putting in the Seed'. Performance stylistics can draw on corpus analysis too.

KEYWORDS:

Corpus linguistics, corpus stylistics, Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, poetry, rhizome, stylistics, Web.

RESUMEN

A partir de ciertas ideas clave del filósofo francés Gilles Deleuze y su colaborador, el psicoanalista Félix Guattari, ofrezco un compromiso interpretativo alternativo con la poesía. En este enfoque, un poema se entiende como una invitación a la creatividad del lector por medio de un viaje interpretativo a través de la web que es individual, edificante y estimulante. Este enfoque permite que la oblicuidad y la provocación de un poema desencadene, aleatoriamente, el conocimiento y los recursos en la web que son nuevos para el lector; a su vez, estos pueden usarse como nuevas perspectivas hacia el poema para interpretarlo de manera individual. Este compromiso implica un análisis estilístico que lleve a su interpretación

El elemento basado en la web de la estilística interpretativa es centrífugo, sacando al lector del poema, viajando de sitio web en sitio web. Este movimiento centrífugo lo equilibra otro centrípeto que introduce al lector en los patrones del poema. Esta necesidad centrípeta beneficia de manera efectiva al análisis estilístico. Tradicionalmente, el análisis estilístico se ha usado para ofrecer evidencia lingüística para la interpretación de una obra literaria. Sin embargo, influenciado por las ideas de Deleuze y Guattari, también uso el análisis estilístico de manera no tradicional -para activar la interpretación de un poema. En este artículo, el poema utilizado para demostrar la estilística interpretativa es de Robert Frost, "Plantando la semilla". La estilística interpretativa también puede beneficiarse del análisis del corpus.

PALABRAS CLAVE:

Lingüística de corpus, estilística de corpus, Gilles Deleuze, Félix Guattari, poesía, rizoma, estilística, web.

1. INTRODUCTION

1.1. Orientation

A common approach to reading a poem is initially to ask 'what is this poem about?' or 'what is the poet trying to say?' and to come to a general interpretation about the poem which could be shared by others. Another conventional move is to offer a more personal interpretation of the poem and thus answer the question 'what does this poem mean to me'?

Taking as stimulus some key ideas of the French philosopher, Gilles Deleuze, and his collaborator the psychoanalyst, Félix Guattari, as well as web search engine literacy, I demonstrate an alternative interpretative engagement -one which performs a poem. …

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