Countdown in the Senate

By McQuillan, Bill | Independent Banker, May 1998 | Go to article overview

Countdown in the Senate


McQuillan, Bill, Independent Banker


Early last month, the U.S. House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed HR 1151, the credit union wish list bill, which would overturn the February Supreme Court decision declaring that credit unions had overstepped their membership boundaries. In writing the bill, the speaker of the house and the House Banking Committee defiantly sidestepped the banking industry's requests to rein in the credit union industry's illegal expansion of the common bond, while cutting back credit unions' commercial lending powers.

April, however, was not a total washout. We were successful at derailing Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich in his effort to tie the anti-banking credit union bill with the anti-banking financial restructuring bill (HR 10), which would have meant double jeopardy for community banks.

The credit union wish list is now in the hands of the nation's senators. In early April, K. Reid Pollard, president and CEO of Randolph Bank and Trust in Asheboro, N.C., testified before the Senate Banking Committee and dubbed the AT&T Family Federal Credit Union a "taxfree NationsBank." He couldn't be more right. But your senators need to hear from more bankers than just Reid Pollard. They need to hear from you.

And as chairman of the Credit Union Coordinating Committee, which spans the IBAA, the ABA and the ACB, I am playing a hands-on role in devising a common strategy to meet the credit union threat.

At the Annual Convention and Techworld in Honolulu, we announced a $1 million banker fly-in campaign, whereby we would pay for the airfare and hotel accommodations of all community bankers who could make appointments with their representatives in Washington, D.C., and fight the credit union bill. Hundreds of community bankers from around the country have met this challenge and have marched up to Capitol Hill and told their side of the story. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Countdown in the Senate
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.