Hemingway's Second War: Bearing Witness to the Spanish Civil War

By Borchard, Gregory | Journalism History, Winter 2013 | Go to article overview

Hemingway's Second War: Bearing Witness to the Spanish Civil War


Borchard, Gregory, Journalism History


Vernon, Alex. Hemingway's Second War: Bearing Witness to the Spanish Civil War. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2011. 263 pp. $29.95.

Alex Vernon's Hemingways Second War: Bearing Witness to the Spanish Civil War tells part of the story of Ernest Hemingway's experiences as a reporter during the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), offering new insight for understanding Hemingway's role in creating the movie documentary The Spanish Earth on behalf of pro-Republican forces. An associate professor of English at Hendrix College in Conway, Arkansas, Vernon has authored several books on military reporting, and Hemingway's Second War demonstrates his familiarity with the complexities of writing about war from the perspective of a journalist. Vernon writes with a clear command of the biographical details surrounding the celebrated American novelist's life, as well as the historical context of the time in which he wrote. Yet, the organization of the book - in three loosely interdependent parts - complicates the focus of its narrative. While each of the three parts contributes to a better understanding of the important events surrounding both Hemingway's life and this difficult era of Spanish and world history, the book as a whole could read more easily with a unified thesis from beginning to end.

As a correspondent for the North American News Alliance, Hemingway made four trips to Spain in 1937 and 1938. Along with reporting on the war, Hemingway codirected with Joris Ivens and John Dos Passos The Spanish Earth, a propaganda film with commentary from Hemingway as well as narration from legendary film figure Orson Welles. Vernon's primary contribution to literature about Hemingway includes the exploration of his role in helping to create the film, which the filmmakers designed to tell the story of Spanish farmers and to attract sympathy for the democratic resistance entrenched in the fight against the Nationalist leader Francisco Franco. Upon its release, the film received a mix of both praise and criticism - the former for its innovative documentary style, the latter for the film's unsubtly propagandist message, but Vernon suggests the experience of making the film also played an influential role in Hemingway's later career as a novelist. Juxtaposing material from the film with story elements in For Whom the Bell Tous, Hemingway's most public reflections on Spain, Vernon succeeds in linking the two; however, with the storyline moving in different directions from time to time, this particular relationship between Hemingway's nonfiction and fiction could be cast as either academic rumination or history. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Hemingway's Second War: Bearing Witness to the Spanish Civil War
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.