Career Advancement, School Relations and Support Service Factors as Determinant of Teacher Productivity in Public Secondary Schools in Oyo State, Nigeria

By Adu, Emmanuel Olusola; Titilola, Oshati et al. | International Journal of Education, October 1, 2012 | Go to article overview

Career Advancement, School Relations and Support Service Factors as Determinant of Teacher Productivity in Public Secondary Schools in Oyo State, Nigeria


Adu, Emmanuel Olusola, Titilola, Oshati, Eze, Ifeoma R., International Journal of Education


Abstract

This study investigated the extent to which these factors determine teacher productivity in public secondary schools. The study revealed among others the composite contribution of career advancement factor (β = 0.36; t=6.82; p < .05); and school relations factor (β = 0.13; t=2.59; p <.05). On the contrary, support services factor (β = 0.09; t=1.87; p > 05) was not significant in predicting teacher productivity. The factors such as career advancement and school relations factors revealed a positive impact on productiveness and effectiveness of teachers. A good work system should be created by which teachers will maintain high effectiveness level.

Keywords: teacher productivity; career advancement; school relation and support service

Background to the Study

Improvement in the productivity of Nigerian employees in the different sectors of the economy has remained the recurrent themes of many symposia, conferences and workshops. It is a recognized fact that productivity is a critical factor in socio-economic development of any nation, for it is one of the key determinants of the standard of living of the citizenry. There is therefore no doubt that improved productivity is at the core of the activity of all organizations, suggest that the survival and growth of most human understandings depend to a large extend on the organization level of productivity which itself depends on the productivity of employee.

Workers in any organization are the prime factors that propel the organization. The levels of efficiency and productivity depend on the workers. Ogunsanya (1981) opines that the efficiency with which any school organization can be operated depends on the effectiveness of teachers on the job both as individual and collectively as a team.

Despite the realization of the importance of productivity, there has been and there are still some general slurs and slumps in the employees' efforts and actual performance, the declining productivity level in many organizations have led to widespread criticism about such organizations (Ilori, 1995). Low productivity in the Nigeria's educational system is reflected in general complaints by stakeholders of the primary, secondary and tertiary institutions. According to Akporehe (2011), the main objective of the secondary school education is to train individuals to read, write and be numerically literate but in recent times, it is noteworthy that many secondary school leavers can neither read nor write appropriately. Judging from the products of the Nigerian secondary schools, the gateway to tertiary institutions, there is a big question mark on level of performance and the productivity of their teachers. It is also observed that many Nigerians avoid sending their wards to public secondary school, because their products are mostly unable to read and write.

Graduates of the different levels know very little of what they are supposed to have learnt in school. The poor results of school certificate examinations over the years have provided justification for the expressed concerns. According to West African Examination Council (WAEC, 2007), the failure rate for English language in the past five years surpassed that of the percentage of credits scored in Senior School Certificate Examination (SSCE) conducted by it between 2001 and 2005. While in Mathematics, a fluctuating trend was recorded by the candidates during this period. Besides, Punch (2008) reveals that out of a total of 1,369,142 candidates that sat for West African Senior School Certificate Examination (WASSCE) in Nigeria in 2008, only 188,442 representing 13.76% obtained five credit passes and above in English Language,Mathematics and three other subjects. While 947,945 candidates representing 83% failed the examination. The analysis suggests that all is not well with students' performance in secondary schools.

However, every poor performance and failures are usually blamed on the workers by the management. …

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