Disability in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam

By Black, Kathy | Anglican and Episcopal History, March 2013 | Go to article overview

Disability in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam


Black, Kathy, Anglican and Episcopal History


Disability in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Edited by Darla Schumm and Michael Stoltzfus. (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011, Pp. 246. $90.00.); Disability and Religious Diversity: Cmss-Cultural and Interreligious Perspectives. Edited by Darla Schumm and Michael Stoltzfus. (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011, Pp. 234. $90.00.)

Disability in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam and Disability and Religious Diversity are two edited volumes that were originally part of the same research project of Darla Schumm and Michael Stoltzfus. Both the editors and the contributors write from an academic perspective on the topic as well as from a personal perspective, each living with some sort of disability. After collecting submissions that varied greatly, the material was divided into these two volumes for publication. Each chapter is unique in its own right. There was no attempt for a common methodology, common question to be addressed, or common theoretical approach. The common thread that runs throughout is perspectives on disability from different religious traditions.

Disability in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam deals with the influence of sacred texts, historical interpretations, and religious practices on the lives of individual persons with disabilities and on broader cultural attitudes toward body, health, and "difference." Chapters include: "Reading Talmudic Bodies: the Gaze in Rabbinic Judaism," "What the Rabbis Heard: Deafness in the Mishnah," "Leprosy in Early Islam," "Vitiliginous (Sk) Inscriptions: Historical Religious Interpretations of Involuntary Whitening Skin," "Out of the Darkness: Examining the Rhetoric of Blindness in the Gospel of John," "Resurrecting Deformity: Augustine on Wounded and Scarred Bodies in the Heavenly Realm," "Performance of Muslim Daily Prayer by Physically Disabled Practitioners," "Religious Metaphors as ajustification for Eugenic Control: a Historical Analysis," "Catholicism and Disability: Sacred and Profane," "Best Practices for Faith-Based Organizations Working with Deaf Communities in Developing Countries," and "Disability and the Love of Wisdom: De-forming, Re-forming, and Performing Philosophy of Religion. …

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