Driving Forces for the Professionalisation of Human Resource Management in Europe

By Nica, Elvira | Economics, Management and Financial Markets, December 2012 | Go to article overview

Driving Forces for the Professionalisation of Human Resource Management in Europe


Nica, Elvira, Economics, Management and Financial Markets


ABSTRACT. The material gathered in this study provides a rich and diverse context for understanding the impact of management knowledge on economic performance, the necessity of distinguishing between organizational development and professionalism, and the organizational effects of gender composition. The paper generates insights about the relationship between the relative resources and importance assigned to the human resources function and its social context, the eligible status of human resources management, the dynamics informing the composition of the professional group working in human resources, and the contingent nature of human resources management.

JEL Classification: O15, O32, G32

Keywords: human resources management, professionalism, economic performance

1. Introduction

The main objective of this paper is to explore and describe the professionalization of family firms, the role and importance of gender as a core category for analyzing organizational processes, and the integration of adult educators into organizations. Related topics I will explore include cultural impediments to professionalization, the worldwide implementation of the norm of equal opportunity, and the effects of the proportion of women at the occupational and at the organizational level.

2. Cultural Impediments to Professionalization

Ramamoorti points out that the scourge of fraud is a global phenomenon: high-level fraud is frequently a "team sport" and often involves collusion, and fraud deterrence and detection should focus on how to deal with the underlying interpersonal and behavioral dynamics. Organizations should strive to understand the behavioral root causes of fraud. Human beings commit crimes, sometimes as agents on behalf of their organizations. The need to rationalize wrongdoing as being defensible is psychologically rooted in the notion of cognitive dissonance. Internal controls are quite powerless against collusion and management override of controls.1 Marx's analysis highlights the contradiction between capitalism's reduction of value to abstract labor time and nature's contribution to wealth production. Marxist political economy can make a substantial contribution to ecological economics. Value relations should be analyzed in terms of capitalism's specific relations of production. Marx does not deny the natural basis of either the surplus product or surplus-value. The strong sustainability approach does not relate the criticality of natural capital to the economy's relations of production. Marxism sees mainstream "natural-capital" theory as an analytical reification of capitalism's alienation and exploitation of labor and nature, overcoming the materialsocial dualism represented by the natural capital debate within ecological economics. The reduction of the human environment to a substitutable resource is associated with the reduction of sustainable development to sustainable capital accumulation?

Social greens are concerned about the rise in the share of highly polluting industry in developing countries, have long condemned the ecological and labor practices of TNCs operating in developing countries, focus on the role of corporations in the global capitalist framework, are critical of current patterns of global financing, and have attacked SAPs as significant sources of unsustainable development in adjusting countries.3 The financial crisis turned into an economic crisis tout-court. The processes of globalization and financialization redefine the new international hierarchical structures. International relations are determined more by dynamics of geoeconomic variables rather than by geopolitical variables. We are witnessing a crisis of governance of the market and its hierarchies.4 Emerging markets are ideal territory for many growth-seeking global investors. Emerging markets nations are among the world's fastest-growing economies. Emerging markets countries are going to be absorbing market share from the developed nations. …

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