Have Your Say

Winnipeg Free Press, April 17, 2013 | Go to article overview

Have Your Say


The terrorists have won

The fact of this Boston Marathon tragedy urges me emphatically to ask, why are the North American media doing the terrorists' job for them?

Regardless of whether anyone ever goes to trial for this atrocity or not, the act was a success. The message being repeated endlessly is clear. We know next to nothing about what really happened, but we should all be very, very afraid. The media insist on granting the criminals their goal -- nationwide terror.

Toronto mathematician Jeffrey Rosenthal has pointed out more people die in traffic fatalities every month in the U.S. than did in the entire 9/11 terrorist attack on New York. We are all astronomically more likely to die in a car crash than a terrorist attack, but the media raise no red flags regarding that likelihood.

I am not for a moment suggesting precautions against terrorist attacks should be reduced. In fact, in this climate where the media guarantee the criminals will overwhelmingly succeed in getting their message through, I'd feel more secure if anti-terrorist measures were increased. At the moment, they're receiving far too much encouragement.

The war on terror will only progress when the media take a rational attitude toward the events, based on a sense of proportion and perspective they have no problem adopting toward the threat posed to our lives by the automobile industry.

JOHN H. BAILLIE

Winnipeg

ñü

The attack in Boston is terrible, yet a U.S. airstrike killed more than two dozen Afghan civilians, including 11 children, just last week. These were families who were simply sitting in their homes. Where were our hearts and prayers then?

This is not meant to delegitimize the chaos in Boston. Of course, it's an atrocity and of course, our hearts should go out to those affected. But we all need to better educate ourselves and re-evaluate our priorities. Because, like the shootings in Newton and Aurora last year, our initial thoughts and prayers will soon be thwarted by a Kardashian getting pregnant or Justin Bieber saying something ignorant.

We need to mourn but we also need to learn about what's going on not only here and next door but abroad. We need to realize that there are atrocities like this, and much worse, around the world every day.

We need to start caring. All of us. And to demand change. Because if we don't, these atrocities will become more frequent, both at home and abroad, until one day we turn on the TV and it's our friends and family who have become the victims.

KOSTA VARTSAKIS

Winnipeg

A respectable trade

Re: Mystery man to lead Venezuela (April 16). If Poland could elect a plumber as president without falling apart, I'm sure Venezuela will be fine with a bus driver.

CHRISTINA LìPEZ

Winnipeg

Selective complaining

Peter Squire's April 15 column, Exorbitant tax hurts market, buyers, is quite ironic. I agree that the land transfer tax should be adjusted, but what about realtors' fees? …

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