Historical Novel Set in Mexico Strains Credibility

Winnipeg Free Press, May 4, 2013 | Go to article overview

Historical Novel Set in Mexico Strains Credibility


THERE are historical novels and there are historical romances.

Canadian author Oakland Ross holds out the promise of the former, but delivers a story akin to the latter.

The Empire of Yearning is the second volume in a projected trilogy set in Mexico. The Toronto journalist's first novel in the series was The Dark Virgin (2001), a tale about Spanish conquistador Hernan Cortes's conquest of the Aztecs.

This book skips ahead three centuries, to the 1860s, and finds Prince Maximilian of Austria as Mexico's newly crowned emperor.

He's kept on the throne by dint of an occupying French army that recently defeated the forces of elected liberal president Benito Juarez, who's now in exile in northern Mexico.

The initial storyline is pretty anemic. However, it gets more robust as the narrative progresses. And the plot, once it finally starts to unfold, clips along nicely.

The main character is Diego Serrano, a bookish, one-armed anti-monarchist, whose lifelong friend, Baldemar Peralta, is in jail and due to be executed for his failed assassination attempt on a general of the ruling imperial regime.

Peralta's beautiful sister, operatic singer Angela, has tasked Serrano with somehow freeing her brother.

Serrano's a tongue-tied goof around Angela, clumsily trying to mask his romantic desires, even as he conspires with her to free her incarcerated brother.

In circumstances that defy all odds, and strain credibility, republican Serrano eventually ends up private secretary to the emperor. He finds he quite likes Maximilian, which leaves him conflicted, personally and politically.

Equally hard to credit, Peralta and a gaggle of his confederates are freed by the emperor in an amnesty. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Historical Novel Set in Mexico Strains Credibility
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.