Member Profiles

Contemporary Sexuality, April 2013 | Go to article overview

Member Profiles


Each month we sit down (virtually) with AASECT members to find out about how they came to their work, what their current passions are in the field of human sexuality, and what they love most about being a sexuality professional. If you are interested in being profiled in a future Contemporary Sexuality let us know!

Jayleen Galarza

Whether she is working with sex therapy clients, running groups for young people in her role as a mental health counselor at The County Alternative High School in Media, PA, or exploring the meaning and construction of identity among Latina women who have sex with women for her doctoral research, which she completed this year, Jayleen Galarza says that her work is always either implicitly or explicitly about social justice. Jayleen has been an AASECT member since 2010, and her workshop at the 45th annual conference in Miami is titled Borderland Queer: Increasing Sexological Inclusivity of Queer Latinas.

CS: When you meet someone new, how do you describe what you do?

JG: I generally say that I'm a clinical social worker who specializes in sexuality issues. I feel that encompasses everything I value about my work. There are times I mention that I am a certified sex therapist, which seems to confuse, disturb, or impress folks. It is pretty funny to see the different reactions from people when I tell them I've chosen sexuality as a profession.

CS: Tell us a little about your work.

JG: I provide therapy to adolescents and young adults who are referred by their home districts for a variety of emotional and behavioral concerns. I'm a part of a team charged with providing weekly individual and group therapy to those youth while also interfacing with school staff, policies, and procedures.

As part of my work I developed and facilitate a psycho-educational sexuality group for clients, called Connections. In the Connections group we address multiple aspects of sexuality such as sexual and gender identity, orientation, love, relationships, trauma, abuse, and STIs.

The areas of sexuality that I'm most interested in are issues related to the intersections of sexual and gender identities and ethnic identities and experiences. As a self-identified queer, Latina, and sexuality professional, I find it my duty to shed light on this aspect of sexuality.

I love working with adolescents and young adults. It's a challenging time in youths' development, as they navigate tough choices around identity and intimacy. They are trying desperately to figure themselves out in the face of peer pressure, family/cultural expectations, and societal messages around self-image.

CS: What educational, training, and/or life experience brought you to work as a sexuality professional?

JG: My path began as an undergraduate at East Stroudsburg University (ESU). I was an English major and Women's Studies minor, and was heavily involved in ESU's women's center. I helped bring the Vagina Monologues to campus, which produced some of my most proud moments as a performer and co-director. I also tackled sexuality initiatives. I led the LGBT student group, facilitated a Day of Silence on campus, and helped to coordinate Take Back the Night. These experiences fueled my passion for both social justice and sexuality.

I went on to earn both my Masters of Social Work (MSW) and Masters of Education (M.Ed) in Human Sexuality at Widener University. I completed my PhD in Human Sexuality at Widener University in 2013.

CS: What's the biggest challenge you are struggling with right now professionally?

JG: One thing I am struggling with professionally is navigating some of the challenges in addressing sexuality within a public school setting. Although I am happy to work in an environment in which I get to incorporate my skills as a counselor and educator, there are times when I am limited in the types of activities I can implement.

CS: What do you do when you aren't working? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Member Profiles
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.