Including School Resource Officers in School-Based Crisis Intervention

By Brock, Stephen E. | National Association of School Psychologists. Communique, March/April 2013 | Go to article overview

Including School Resource Officers in School-Based Crisis Intervention


Brock, Stephen E., National Association of School Psychologists. Communique


Summarized by Daniel McNair, Georgia Southern University

This article discusses the unique role of trained police officers, school resource officers (SROs), in our educational systems. While the traditional roles of SRO activities such as traffic monitoring or drug awareness training are mentioned, the article's primary focus is upon the distinct skills these professionals possess in supporting the efforts of school crisis and prevention teams. Although the article is primarily a literature review coupled with a few case examples rather than a methodical investigation of quantitative data, the authors effectively communicate the value of SROs in addressing the needs of an educational agency in a time of crisis.

The authors begin by describing the change in general law enforcement practices that have arisen in preceding decades as officers have increasingly been called upon to assist in the deescalation of emotionally charged situations that include irrational, aggressive, or potentially violent individuals. Due to this changing dynamic of law enforcement, officers now receive specialized training in crisis response and violence prevention.

The support for SROs has increased nationwide in response to the frequency of school shootings that began in the 1990s. Today, SROs have the option to receive supplementary training to include school crisis response, deescalation techniques, threat assessment strategies, antibullying strategies, recognition of child abuse, social-emotional support, cultural awareness, and other activities that mirror the traditional roles of mental health training programs. This extra training focus upon service delivery to youth and school stakeholders is advantageous to SROs wishing to participate on school crisis response and prevention teams. In addition to their role in the educational system, these individuals are also law enforcement officers and bring to the table experience and knowledge of local law enforcement and emergency management procedures. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Including School Resource Officers in School-Based Crisis Intervention
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.