World Film Locations: New Orleans

By Ingle, Zachary | Film & History, Spring 2013 | Go to article overview

World Film Locations: New Orleans


Ingle, Zachary, Film & History


World Film Locations: New Orleans. Ed. Scott Jordan Harris. Bristol, UK: Intellect, 2012. 128 pp.

From classical Hollywood offerings Jezebel (1938) and Saratoga Trunk (1945) to newer films like Jonah Hex (2010) and The Mechanic (2011), World Film Locations: New Orleans explores some of the most notable instances of New Orleans locations in film. The book is comprised of scene reviews from 46 films, with seven longer essays that cover such topics as New Orleans jazz in film, supernatural representations of New Orleans, and the city's movie theatres. Unlike some of the other World Film Locations volumes, this one takes a few more liberties in terms of the types of films reviewed: documentaries (When the Levees Broke, 2006; The Big Uneasy, 2010), animated films (All Dogs Go to Heaven, 1989; The Princess and the Frog, 2009), a short documentary (Modern New Orleans, 1940), and even a "sexploitation shocker" (Girl in Trouble, 1963) are all included. Perhaps because of the state's tax incentives, fourteen of the films covered are post-2002's Louisiana Motion Picture Incentive Act that has boosted the city's current status as "Hollywood South," the subject of yet another essay.

Exercises in brevity, the 250-word scene reviews usually explain the significance of the location in the scene and the film as a whole, sometimes commenting on the history of the locations - be it church, restaurant, famous building, hotel, prison, street, zoo, or cemetery - with some decent criticism mixed in as well. Even those New Orleans locations recreated in Hollywood (for some of the older films, for example. …

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