Evaluation of a Stress Management Training Program for Adults with ADHD-A Pilot Study

By Langer, Sylvia; Greiner, Anja et al. | Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy, July 1, 2013 | Go to article overview

Evaluation of a Stress Management Training Program for Adults with ADHD-A Pilot Study


Langer, Sylvia, Greiner, Anja, Koydemir, Selda, Schütz, Astrid, Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy


We conducted a pilot study to examine the feasibility, acceptance, and subjective effectiveness of a new stress management training program tailored to the needs of adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). After a baseline evaluation of perceived chronic stress and coping strategies, 18 adults with ADHD participated in four sessions of stress management training and completed posttests on chronic stress and additional measures. Participants rated the acceptance and effectiveness of the training as high. Positive effects were found with respect to perceptions of excessive demands at work, chronic worry, and general stress experience. The findings suggest that stress management training is a valuable adjuvant for the treatment of ADHD in adults. Further development and evaluation of the intervention is desirable.

Keywords: attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); attention deficit disorder (ADD); adults; stress; coping; stress management training program

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults has received increasing attention in contemporary research and clinical practice. Historically, ADHD has been considered to be a childhood disorder, and it was assumed that the disorder was outgrown by adolescence. Today, there is clear evidence that ADHD symptoms often persist throughout the lifespan because a growing body of literature has shown that about 33% of the affected patients do not show full remission in adulthood (Biederman, Mick, & Faraone, 2000; Faraone, Biederman, & Mick, 2006; Franke et al., 2011). In fact, the prevalence of ADHD in the general adult population is around 5% (Franke et al., 2011). Despite the high prevalence and clinical relevance, the examination of adult ADHD-and its related psychosocial problems and specific interventions in particular-is still in an early stage, and more research in symptom-oriented treatment is needed (Coogan et al., 2012). It is also known that pharmacotherapy alone is rarely sufficient for ADHD patients given that they often seek additional help in the form of psychosocial treatment (Ramsay & Rostain, 2007). Thus, further scientific research on ADHD-related problems as well as the transfer of findings into clinical practice to develop appropriate interventions is warranted.

Adults with ADHD are seriously impaired in various ways. The main symptoms are attention problems, impulsivity, and inner restlessness/hyperactivity, but the disorder rarely occurs in isolated form: In 75% of clinical patients, it is associated with at least one comorbid disorder (Biederman et al., 1993) such as mood swings and personality accentuations, sleep and anxiety disorders, or drug abuse (Kooij et al., 2010). Above all, the syndrome affects numerous psychosocial functions (DSM-IV-TR; American Psychiatric Association, 2000) that are associated with various difficulties in certain life domains (for an overview, see Krause & Krause, 2009; Young & Bramham, 2007). Because of procrastination and other problems with maintaining motivation and attention, adults with ADHD experience more occupational problems such as school and academic failure, unemployment or underemployment, low income, and lowered job performance as compared to nonaffected individuals (Barkley, Fischer, Smallish, & Fletcher, 2006; Biederman, 2005; Biederman & Faraone, 2006; Biederman et al., 2006; Murphy & Barkley, 1996). They also frequently suffer from interpersonal difficulties such as feelings of uneasiness in social situations, relationship instability, parental conflicts, and lack of assertiveness (Biederman, 2005; Canu & Carlson, 2003; Murphy & Barkley, 1996). These deficits and impairments typically lead to increased stress levels and affect the quality of daily life in adults with ADHD. Many studies have highlighted the presence of increased subjective stress for individuals with ADHD (e.g., Adler & Chua, 2002; Hirvikoski, Olsson, et al. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Evaluation of a Stress Management Training Program for Adults with ADHD-A Pilot Study
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.