The George Washington University

By Slahor, Stephenie | Law & Order, March 2013 | Go to article overview

The George Washington University


Slahor, Stephenie, Law & Order


The George Washington University (GW) is located in Washington, DC. The university is comprised of three major campuses: the Foggy Bottom Campus, the Mount Vernon Campus and the GW Virginia Science and Technology Campus.

Created in 1821 through an Act of Congress, the university fulfills President George Washington's vision of an educational institution in the heart of the nation's capital, dedicated to educating and preparing the future leaders of the nation.

Washington left a bequest toward that same objective, and President James Monroe signed the Act of Congress that created the university. The university is now the largest institution of higher education in the District of Columbia, with more than 20,000 students.

GW offers a wide range of disciplines, including those of interest to law enforcement and security personnel. While most universities and colleges can boast of their more famous graduates, GW's alumni and former students include such prominent names as J. Edgar Hoover, J. William Fulbright, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, and Colin Powell.

In a time of expensive tuition for higher education, it is noteworthy that, among the university's strategic initiatives, is a dedication to a five-year fixed tuition rate to ensure a student's tuition will remain stable for up to five years.

Need-based and merit-based institutional grants are also available to help keep education affordable, and those grants remain at least at the levels awarded at the time of the student's initial enrollment The university is pledged to investment in academic learning, research and the student experience each year, to increase the productivity of its research and instructional programs.

Besides its on-campus programs, The George Washington University offers select undergraduate and graduate degrees, certificates and individual courses exclusively online. Students have the opportunity to participate in online courses and programs that extend to all parts of the GW community, which is of benefit to those professionals who are unable to attend classes on campus.

Of particular significance to law enforcement and security are the Master's and Doctoral degree programs that include studies in Forensic Sciences, Professional Studies in Public Leadership, Decision Sciences (management, risk analysis, project/program management, etc. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The George Washington University
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.