The Evolution of Modern Human Diversity: A Study of Cranial Variation

By Lynn, Richard | Mankind Quarterly, Spring 1998 | Go to article overview

The Evolution of Modern Human Diversity: A Study of Cranial Variation


Lynn, Richard, Mankind Quarterly


The Evolution of Modern Human Diversity: A Study of Cranial Variation M. A. Lahr

Cambridge University Press, 1996. Pp. 416.

Marta Lahr is a Brazilian anthropologist who has spent some years at the University of Cambridge studying human cranial variation, and has here produced a valuable work of scholarship assembling worldwide data derived from the fossil record. She uses the data to evaluate theories of the evolution of contemporary human populations and their dispersal over the globe, and concludes that the evidence supports the single origin theory of modern humans rather than the multiregional theory.

This work will be a useful source book for those interested in the evolutionary history of living human populations. Its principal weakness is its failure to mention, let alone discuss, what may be the most significant aspect of human cranial variation. The growth of intelligence and brain size in the evolution of Homo sapiens is a wellestablished and non-controversial fact, but the gradient of brain size in relation to Latitude is not mentioned. Excluding post-Paleolithic migrations, such as the peopling of the Americas and, for example, the settlement of Malays in Malaysia or the Indonesians in Indonesia, human brain size corresponds loosely but significantly to the distance of a population from the equator. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Evolution of Modern Human Diversity: A Study of Cranial Variation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.