Pressing for a Second Violence against Women Law

By Erickson, Jan | National NOW Times, January 1998 | Go to article overview

Pressing for a Second Violence against Women Law


Erickson, Jan, National NOW Times


A major expansion of the 1994 Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) will soon be introduced in the 105th Congress. NOW and the National Task Force on Violence Against Women are playing an instrumental role in developing and backing the Violence Against Women Act of 1998.

VAWA II, as it is dubbed, contains a sorely needed SI billion for constructing battered women's shelters over the next five years. Other major elements of the bill address the needs of battered women in the workplace, focus on sexual assault on campus and in the military, establish new programs for victims' services and fund training for judges.

Safeguarding Battered Women at Work

A new thrust of the legislation responds to battered women at work, especially lowincome workers and welfare-to-work participants. Studies show that a place of employment is one of the most dangerous places for women. Former partners track them down there, stalk. harass and abuse them on the job.

One innovative approach in the bill offers tax incentives to encourage employers to establish programs to assist survivors of domestic violence. Another amends the Occupational Health and Safety Act to require employers to take steps to maintain workplaces safe from violence.

A key item in the bill requires that workers compensation plans include coverage for physical and psychiatric injuries resulting from domestic violence. Employers are also encouraged to provide time off for survivors to attend court hearings and receive medical care.

Funding for Training Resistant Judges

An especially important component is the continuation of the judicial training section, which first appeared in the 1994 act but has never been funded. New provisions would make training mandatory for certain types of judges.

Reportedly, judges have been resistant to receiving education on domestic violence and many continue to ignore state and federal laws on the subject. Domestic violence activists report that judges frequently doubt and often more severely penalize women who cite battering or child abuse in divorce and child custody matters.

Taking Sexual Violence Seriously

VAWA II proposes substantial initiatives against sexual violence, including support for programs that provide enhanced protection from sexual predators, prohibitions against sexual misconduct in prison between corrections staff and prisoners, creation of a national commission to review standards of practice and training for sexual assault examinations and establishment of a National Resource Center on Sexual Assault, with a national sexual assault hotline.

The bill calls for a national summit of sports, political and media figures to develop a plan to deter domestic violence and sexual assault among athletes. …

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