Defending Control Systems against Cyber-Attacks

By Kamizono, Mayumi | The Daily Yomiuri (Toyko, Japan), June 16, 2013 | Go to article overview

Defending Control Systems against Cyber-Attacks


Kamizono, Mayumi, The Daily Yomiuri (Toyko, Japan)


A whole city blacks out, the traffic lights are down and public transportation is paralyzed--such a scenario caused by cyber-attacks on infrastructure was previously thought to occur only in movies and books. However, such concerns are becoming a reality, as seen in Iran, where a computer virus crippled the operation of nuclear facilities in 2010.

To prevent such attacks in Japan, the country's first cybersecurity testing facility exclusively for control systems opened last month.

Control systems integrate and manage equipment and machines at factories or other infrastructure. Information networks for such systems are increasingly connected to outside networks, making them more vulnerable to intruders.

End of security myth

Red lights flashed, piercing alarms sounded, and chemicals flooded out of tanks at a plant that had been hit by a cyber-attack--all part of a drill at testing facility of the Control System Security Center (CSSC) that opened May 28 in Tagajo, Miyagi Prefecture.

A mock chemical plant was used for the drill, under a scenario that a computer virus had intruded into the system and manipulated figures for controlling chemical levels.

"The security myth of control systems has crumbled. Those concerned should be aware of the danger," said Akio Sato, a chief researcher at Mitsubishi Research Institute, which serves as the secretariat of the CSSC.

The CSSC, which launched in March last year, is a technical and research organization comprising 19 companies and institutions, including Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. and Hitachi, Ltd.

The Tagajo testing facility was built with a 2 billion yen subsidy from the Economy, Trade and Industry Ministry and has a floor space of about 2,000 square meters where mock plants were set up using seven different types of control systems, including those for electricity, gas and buildings.

The facility provides an environment where researchers and engineers can simulate taking countermeasures against cyber-attacks. The facility also holds training sessions for those who are interested and will be used to train personnel to respond quickly to an emergency.

"Most control systems used to be separated from outside networks, so they were not prone to becoming a target of cyber-attacks." Sato said. "However, it's becoming more common to connect control systems to outside networks for maintenance and production management," he added, holding a tablet computer for checking control systems for each mock plant. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Defending Control Systems against Cyber-Attacks
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.