Promoting Self-Authorship of College Educators: Exploring the Impact of a Faculty Development Program

By Gunersel, Adalet Baris; Barnett, Pamela et al. | The Journal of Faculty Development, January 2013 | Go to article overview

Promoting Self-Authorship of College Educators: Exploring the Impact of a Faculty Development Program


Gunersel, Adalet Baris, Barnett, Pamela, Etienne, Mary, The Journal of Faculty Development


While the literature on self-authorship has focused on the development of college students and young adults highlighting various developmental tasks associated with the ages 17 through 30 (e.g., Baxter Magolda, 2001, 2003, 2004), in this article, we explore the exercise and development of faculty members' self-authorship as educators, proposing that individuals' self-authorship continues to develop throughout their lives as they grow into new roles and engage new domains. Our study focuses on 12 instructors who participated in a unique faculty development opportunity at a large, urban, research I university and explores how the faculty training program affected faculty self-authorship as educators, specifically the ways in which instructors relate to (a) knowledge and their discipline, (b) themselves as educators, and (c) colleagues and/or students. We conducted semi-structured interviews which were transcribed and analyzed. Findings indicate that the program, like others that manifest the Learning Partnerships Model (Baxter Magolda, 2004b), helped instructors exercise and further develop their self-authorship as educators and that engaging with colleagues from various disciplines influenced instructors' perceptions regarding themselves as educators, their teaching practices, and the nature of knowledge. The significance of our findings lies in the potential to guide the design, implementation, and evaluation of similar professional development programs. Additionally, the study contributes to the understanding of the critical concept of self-authorship in professional contexts and suggests how self-authorship enables individuals to meet new, domain specific challenges.

Introduction

At a recent instructional development program on how to give students feedback in a clinical setting, a faculty member from the school of medicine remarked that, as a physician, he was in "an unusual position." He said, "I have never been taught how to teach! It just isn't part of our medical training." He expected our surprise, but of course we, as faculty developers, have heard similar comments from faculty members across the disciplines. People who recognize themselves as experts in every discipline from accounting to art history often tell us, as if confessing, that they have come to the profession without preparation for their roles as teachers. However, this is not unusual at all. Faculty members are often not trained as teachers (Tanner & Allen, 2006) and thus may not get the opportunity to develop identities as educators during the formal training in their disciplines. As a result, the task of "self-authoring" a professional identity as an educator is accomplished "on the job," as faculty members gain experience and learn about themselves, their students, and the nature of learning.

The literature on self-authorship has focused on the development of college students and young adults, highlighting various developmental tasks associated with the ages 17 through 30 (e.g., Baxter Magolda, 2001, 2003, 2004; Kegan, 1994) and former research has investigated how pedagogical and programmatic reforms in higher education can facilitate college students' self-authorship (e.g., Baxter Magolda, 2001,2003,2004; Baxter Magolda & King, 2004; Hornak & Ortiz, 2004; King & Baxter Magolda, 2004b; Pizzolato, 2003). Meanwhile, literature on faculty members' self-authorship as educators and research on opportunities that help faculty members exercise and develop their self-authorship is lacking. This study contributes to the literature by investigating these topics.

Additionally, this study suggests that individuals' self-authorship enables them to grow into new roles and engage new domains. Classic theories of cognitive development and the literature on self-authorship suggest global development regardless of domain and context (Kail, 2004). Our experiences align with Neo-Piagetian theories which suggest variations in how self-authorship is exercised within different developmental levels depending on the context or domain (Case, 1992; Demetriou, Christou, Spanoudis, & Platsidou, 2002; Halford, 1993; Pascual-Leone, 1970). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Promoting Self-Authorship of College Educators: Exploring the Impact of a Faculty Development Program
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.