We're Better Together

By Sugg, Michele | Contemporary Sexuality, June 2013 | Go to article overview

We're Better Together


Sugg, Michele, Contemporary Sexuality


There isn't a day that goes by that I don't silently thank Pat Schiller for founding AASECT. There are many sexuality organizations, but it's easy to see why AASECT is special. Any time we gather together you can feel the buzz of excitement and anticipation. Our unique cross-pollination of disciplines and perspectives makes for truly exciting conferences, workshops, and trainings. Our certifications represent the highest standards of professional practice. I love our members!

As we make our way to Miami for our annual conference, and later to St. Louis for our Summer Institute, those who attend know that AASECT certification is the gold standard of professional practice in the field of human sexuality and that the quality and diversity of education and trainings offered at the annual conferences and institutes makes for an unbeatable and tremendously rich learning experience.

Certification may not be easy to achieve, but it is worth it. While meeting our standards should be tough, making your way through the process shouldn't be. To make things easier for those of you entering the certification process, or those trying to find programs that fit your career goals, I'm happy to let you know that the AASECT Board of Directors especially Sallie Foley, Jo Marie Kessler, and Sabitha Pillai-Friedman, have been working hard to make the certification process clearer and more understandable, with training resources and degree programs readily searchable on the website.

One of our amazing and dedicated members, Joseph Winn, is working on a flow chart to give a visual to the process of certification. Soon, the seemingly labyrinthine process of certification will be more understandable with resources clearly spelled out.

Other exciting news is the push for a Young Leadership Initiative. AASECT wants to be able to identify up-and-coming, dedicated, and hardworking sexuality professionals interested in leadership positions within the organization. You are our future and I'll be sharing more in the coming months regarding this exciting new initiative.

I want to thank several board members who will be leaving the board at the end of June (watch for the election results to see who will replacing them! …

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