Serving as the Voice for Nursing Education

By Halstead, Judith A. | Nursing Education Perspectives, May/June 2013 | Go to article overview

Serving as the Voice for Nursing Education


Halstead, Judith A., Nursing Education Perspectives


The Voice for Nursing Education: THESE WORDS, FAMILIAR TO ALL MEMBERS, ARE CLOSELY ASSOCIATED WITH THE NLN MISSION. With one of our primary goals to serve as "the voice of nurse educators and champion their interests in political, academic, and professional arenas," we work actively to shape and inform public policy affecting nursing education and nursing workforce development. As an organization, the NLN achieves this goal through a number of key strategies: setting a public policy agenda; advocating with policy makers; collecting, analyzing, and disseminating workforce data; and providing tools to assist nurse educators in their own political advocacy efforts.

Organizational influence in the political, academic, and professional arenas is critical to advancing public policies that benefit nursing and nursing education. However, organizational influence is not enough. We all have our own spheres of influence, as well as opportunities to champion the interests of nurses, nursing education, and, most importantly, patients.

Two important questions for nurse educators are these: How do we best prepare ourselves as individuals to serve as a voice for nursing education? And how do we best prepare our students to develop advocacy skills so that nursing's voice can be effectively heard to influence health care reform? I think these questions are worthy of discussion in all our nursing programs.

As I reflect on my own educational preparation, I find it difficult to recall any substantive learning experiences designed to nurture the development of advocacy skills in the public policy arena. I had an excellent nursing education, and nursing's role in advocating for individual patients was a concept emphasized throughout my learning. Because of this background, I have always been comfortable assuming that role in my own nursing practice, and I have found it easy to convey the importance of this level of patient advocacy to my students. But the nurse's role in advocating at the public policy level, and developing the political skills necessary to successfully influence public policy, received a more cursory treatment. It has taken me some time to feel competent in this area.

My experience is, I believe, a common one. Many nurse educators welcome opportunities to continue their own professional development in public policy advocacy. To help you further develop your advocacy competencies and design learning experiences for students, the NLN provides a number of resources. Let me briefly expand upon the four strategies that the NLN uses to shape public policy.

One strategy is the establishment of a public policy agenda that can be used to support advocacy efforts. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Serving as the Voice for Nursing Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.