The Political Worlds of Women: Gender and Politics in Nineteenth Century Britain: Books

By Hogan, Susan | Times Higher Education, May 2, 2013 | Go to article overview

The Political Worlds of Women: Gender and Politics in Nineteenth Century Britain: Books


Hogan, Susan, Times Higher Education


The Political Worlds of Women: Gender and Politics in Nineteenth Century Britain. By Sarah Richardson. Routledge, 252pp, Pounds 80.00. ISBN 9780415825665. Published 12 March 2013

This book sets out to challenge analyses of 19th-century politics that are based on narrow definitions of the subject and therefore marginalise the role of women. Drawing on a broader definition of political culture, Sarah Richardson illustrates a rich diversity of activism, especially that based on writing in various forms. She points out that a broad array of publications by women were well received when first published, but were subsequently often overlooked by political historians.

Women of all classes, whether or not they advocated women's involvement in politics, were involved in ethical consumption practices, such as boycotting retailers selling slave-grown sugar. The period covered by this book - 1800-70 - is significant for its health and humanitarian reforms. Consequently, these issues, of a so-called quasi-political character, were to exercise women; thus, on diverse subjects, such as prison reform, the abolition of capital punishment, the cruelty of bull-baiting and the callousness of sati, women's voices were heard.

The book is divided into four sections: politics at home, politics in the community and neighbourhoods, the national stage, and international politics. Homes are places where social plans are incubated: this model of the middle-class intellectual home is still very much alive today and some of us would recognise a world of debate over dinner, as linked to subsequent social action, with important thinkers attracting influential guests to their tables.

Political salons, often organised by women, were at the heart of public life, and women and children attended. Women could lobby and petition from the comfort of their own homes in a period in which it would have been taboo for them to approach men directly. Richardson offers as an example Sarah Austin, who initiated a written conversation with William Gladstone, remarking in 1839 that she "shrank from appearing before the public in my own person or behalf, as the author or champion of any opinions whatsoever"! …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Political Worlds of Women: Gender and Politics in Nineteenth Century Britain: Books
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.