Mass Self-Communication

By Nechita, Alina | Journal of Media Research, September 1, 2012 | Go to article overview

Mass Self-Communication


Nechita, Alina, Journal of Media Research


Abstract:

Online communication is a phenomenon that is still growing. The evolution of technology in the domain, allows the transmitter and the receiver to adapt to new types of messages, new forms of encoding and new means of transmission. Nowadays, we rarely call for classical communication, in which the involved subjects use the same code system and a familiar transmitting method. The loss of the involved subject's personality, that are involved in the communicative process, the transmission of information as a reflex, when being part of a virtual community or a social network, are both results of the new trends in the domain.

We often access a horizontal way of communicating in more and more domains, a form of communication that is characteristic to new media, and for specialists and researchers, this type of behavior becomes subject to more and more researches. Between mass communication and the interpersonal one, there came mass self-communication.

Keywords: new media, mass self-communication, social networks, blog, digital media.

The internet and wireless communication through World Wide Web are components of the new, interactive communication process, which is an effect of new media. Manuel Castells, Professor of Sociology and Director of the Internet Interdisciplinary Institute, Open University of Catalonia (UOC), Barcelona, says that the borderlines between communication through mass-media and all other forms and of communication are not clearly defined. World Wide Web is a communication network, used to post of download files that could have audio formats, video formats or could even be actual software; any document that can be transposed in a digital form.

Manuel Castells in Communication Power describes the new form of communication through the new technologies as a revolution in media and he name it mass self-communication..

With help from research in the cognitive sciences and neurosciences applied by Castells, he argues that people's minds are not affected by the rational and logical discourse as post-illuminist, traditional principles argued, but most of our decision-making ability is influenced by affective-emotional attitude we have towards information.

If looked upon from a specific point of view, the internet is merely another communicational mean, available to anyone who has access to a computer with a program that allows accessibility to the network, a modem which converts information from a computer in a form that can allow its transmission through a basic telephone line and an account on a computer connected to such a network.

If analyzed from a more complex perspective, the internet exceeds the capabilities of other communicational means, and has already begun to substantially modify the way in which we communicate.

The domain with the most rapid evolution in the digital industry is represented by mobile computers that have the possibility of connecting to LAN (Local Area Networks) through cable, or WLAN (Wireless Local Area Networks) wirelessly, without a cable. Through WLAN, it is even possible to connect to a network while on the road or while travelling through various transportation means.

The digital, wireless communication first occurred in 1901, when the Italian physicist Guglielmo Marconi first established a transatlantic telegraphic radio communication between a ship at sea and a coastal base, using a wireless telegraph and Morse code (digital in essence).

Going back to the computer network, when connected in virtual space, this is a universal communicational mean. Through it, it's possible to send and receive informational data. The places where this information can be found, are identified through addresses, similar to the postal ones. If the address is known (and there are different methods to find the needed addresses), a certain information can be either sent or identified at that specific address.

The computer networks communicate through a standard language. …

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