Death in the Victorian Family

By Janet, Richard J. | The Catholic Historical Review, April 1998 | Go to article overview

Death in the Victorian Family


Janet, Richard J., The Catholic Historical Review


Death in the Victorian Family. By Pat Jalland. (New York: Oxford University Press. 1996. Pp. xii, 464. $45.00.)

Victorian England is often perceived in the popular mind as a period of cultural repression and religious hypocrisy. Much of what that age valued has been denied in the more permissive atmosphere of late twentieth-century culture to the point that accurate analyses of Victorianism-and particularly Victorian religion-must bear the burden of popular bias and an intellectual climate far removed from the world of the Victorians. Historians like Gertrude Himmelfarb have sought to temper our perceptions with studies of Victorian society and thought that point to the common virtues held by most Victorians which transcended class, gender, and ideology. These transcendent virtues provided a core of beliefs which blended traditional ideas with new socio-economic realities.

Pat Jalland's work on death in Victorian England follows in a similar vein. Drawing on detailed personal accounts of the deaths of close family members found in fifty-five diaries and memoirs (the same sources used in her earlier work, Women, Marriage and Politics, 1860-1914), Jalland offers a revealing picture of the process and perception of death in middle-class Victorian society. Jalland challenges Phillipe Aries' view, included in his ground-breaking study The Hour of Our Death, that nineteenth-century death and dying conformed to a Romantic ideal of the "beautiful death. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Death in the Victorian Family
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.