India, Where Asylum Is a Political Tool, Whistleblower Protection Non-Existent

Hindustan Times (New Delhi, India), July 5, 2013 | Go to article overview

India, Where Asylum Is a Political Tool, Whistleblower Protection Non-Existent


India, July 2 -- Being at the heart of a volatile South Asia, India has been the home to refugees from Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Tibet, Bangladesh, Afghanistan and Myanmar, to name a few.

Edward Snowden, by applying for asylum in India, has joined the over 3,500 other asylum seekers awaiting official response on their status. According to the UN Refugee Agency, the UNHCR, there are over 1.8 lakh refugees residing in India.

A proper legal framework addressing the issue of refugees is absent in India. Allowing or disallowing those seeking refuge is "purely political," said D Suba Chandran, director, Institute of Peace and Conflict Studies, a think tank based in New Delhi. "Not having a proper national law for refugees in black and white gives India leeway," he added.

Historically, India has had a liberal policy of granting asylum to people whether they be from Afghanistan, Nepal, Tibet- people who have escaped political persecution.

The most well-known example is the Dalai Lama, who escaped to India in 1959. Since the early 1990s, former Afghanistan president Najibullah's family has been staying in Delhi with a monthly allowance and security.

For Snowden, asylum here would be a long shot. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

India, Where Asylum Is a Political Tool, Whistleblower Protection Non-Existent
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.