Gay Author No Fan of Catholic Church

Winnipeg Free Press, July 6, 2013 | Go to article overview

Gay Author No Fan of Catholic Church


Pope Benedict XVI's sudden resignation earlier this year motivates the publication "on short notice" of this emotionally charged and often immoderate indictment of the former pontiff.

Vancouver author Daniel Gawthrop, who is gay, says he left the church because, under the spiritual leadership of John Paul II and Joseph Ratzinger -- later Benedict XVI -- the church "no longer wanted someone like me as a member."

Gawthrop is the author of four other books, including an autobiography and titles on environmentalism, AIDS and B.C. politics.

He identifies Ratzinger as "a kind of Satanic muse in my life." His account of Ratzinger's control in the church, especially as prefect of the Congregation of the Doctrine of the Faith, reflects personal disgust with beliefs and practices of Roman Catholicism. Many Catholics may take offence.

Under Pope John XXIII, the Second Vatican Council in the early '60s offered some reform to the church. Gawthrop's assertion that John "was determined to move the church away from Biblical literalism and toward a more pluralistic view of Catholicism" may be wishful thinking.

Still, Vatican II may have led to more openness about contraception and priestly celibacy.

Gawthrop identifies John Paul II and Benedict XVI, "both virulent anti-abortionists," as primary opponents of any such modernization.

The Trial of Pope Benedict begins and ends with wistful descriptions of Ratzinger being tried by the International Criminal Court. He was named in a complaint to the ICC by the Survivor's Network of those Abused by Priests "for command responsibility in the church's denial and cover-up of clerical sex abuse."

As the head of state of Vatican City, the Pope is diplomatically protected from prosecution. A retired pope could be subject to ICC jurisdiction.

While Gawthrop presents a damning account, his position is weakened by overstatement and sometimes startling invective.

Stating that he wrote the book "because Joseph Ratzinger destroyed the Roman Catholic church," Gawthrop describes him as "all-powerful," "God's Rottweiler," and a person with "flawlessly Machiavellian instincts," "lacking . …

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