In Appreciation

By Gonzalez, Estéban | American Jails, May/June 2013 | Go to article overview

In Appreciation


Gonzalez, Estéban, American Jails


Peter Perroncello, MS, CJM, CCHP, CCT, is the recently retired Superintendent of Jail Operations, Norfolk County Sheriff's Office in Dedham, Massachusetts.

After serving nearly four decades in the field of corrections, our dear friend, colleague, and past AJA President (2003-2004), Peter Perroncello has decided to call it a career and retire. The staunchest of advocates for direction supervision, national jail standards, and the continual advancement of our profession, he truly is one of a kind. The comments that follow provide a glimpse into his life outside of corrections, what the future holds for him, and how he intends to handle his new found freedom. Congratulations and thanks for everything, Peter!

* I decided to enter the field of corrections because... Actually, I desired to be a probation officer. So to gain experience, I knocked on the door of the county jail, where I met the sheriff. He had no jobs at the time, but told me to call in a couple of months. That started it - in an 1817-era jail full of tobacco smoke!

* The most unusual job I've ever had was being trained as a construction demolition expert. I was so comfortable with sticks of dynamite that I would forget to safe-keep them and often went home with a trick of them in my back pocket. Back in the 1970s, we did not have the scrutiny that we have today.

* I felt it was important to be a member of AJA and serve on its Board of Directors and the Correctional Trainer Certification Commission because... Sheriff Cliff Marshal, who hired me, got me involved in AJA. He wanted change and wanted to hear about best practices. So in 1989, I began attending the AJA Conferences.

* The hardest thing I ever did was turn the lights off in my office before closing the door for the last time when I retired after 36 years. …

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