Return to Age of Mubarak Looms in Egypt

By El-Haddad, Gehad | Winnipeg Free Press, July 10, 2013 | Go to article overview

Return to Age of Mubarak Looms in Egypt


El-Haddad, Gehad, Winnipeg Free Press


CAIRO -- First came the thugs. A few people with a range of weapons, standing on a bridge overlooking the protesters who were staging a peaceful sit-in at Cairo University. In the early hours of July 3, as the generals were getting ready to announce their coup, 18 were killed and hundreds injured. Yet media reports were of "clashes" between supporters and opponents of President Mohamed Morsi.

Then came a tentative escalation. The Republican Guard shot a man point-blank as he was trying to hang a picture of President Morsi on barbed wire at the guard headquarters, where many believe Morsi is being held. The incident Thursday was caught on camera and witnessed by a BBC journalist who reported: "Before they used any kind of tear gas, they resorted to live fire."

On Friday, a group of anti-Morsi protesters were mobilized to attack a peaceful march from Cairo University, where Morsi supporters were still holding a sit-in, to the offices of the state television network. The anti-Morsi protesters say the procession was headed toward Tahrir Square and that they wanted to stop it. The march's organizers insist that wasn't the case.

What's undeniable in all this is that the attacks were initiated by the anti-Morsi crowds, who clashed with pro-Morsi groups outside Tahrir Square, and that armoured police vehicles did nothing to stop the violence. More dead. More injured.

Then came Monday's tragedy. As before, the military opted to fire live ammunition into the crowds. Scores were killed. Hundreds injured. The army says a "terrorist group" tried to storm its headquarters. Witnesses tell a different story.

It is easy to get lost in the details of all that has happened recently in Egypt. We shouldn't. Here are some stark facts.

First, Egyptians have seen, and heard, this before. The rhetoric the army is using to justify its escalating violence is the same rhetoric of the repressive Hosni Mubarak regime, whose violent security practices abrogated freedom, disregarded human dignity and crushed dissent. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Return to Age of Mubarak Looms in Egypt
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.