2014 National Competition in Organ Improvisation

The American Organist, July 2013 | Go to article overview

2014 National Competition in Organ Improvisation


AMERICAN GUILD OF ORGANISTS

CHAPTERS IN EVERY STATE

Chartered 1896 by the Board of Regents, University of the State of New York

NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS

475 Riverside Drive, Suite 1260, New York, NY 10115; phone 212-870-2310; www.agohq.org

The National Competition in Organ Improvisation seeks to further the art of improvisation by recognizing and rewarding superior performances in the field. A flourishing tradition of improvisation is fundamental to a truly vital musical culture.

Competition Rules

I- ELIGIBILITY AND REGISTRATION

The competition is open to all organists regardless of age or citizenship. First-place winners of previous AGO Improvisation Competitions are not eligible. Each competitor will complete the official application form and submit it along with the $75 registration fee to AGO National Competition in Organ Improvisation at the AGO Headquarters address listed above. The entry must be postmarked by September 15, 2013.

Please note: A competitor may be disqualified at any time for failure to abide by these rules or for actions deemed to be in conflict with the spirit of the competition. Such disqualification will be made by common agreement between the NCOI leadership and the Executive Director of the AGO, in consultation with the National Councillor for Competitions and New Music.

II- PRELIMINARY ROUND

The preliminary round is by recording, evaluated by a panel of three judges. The recording must be made between October 20 and November 11, 2013, and monitored by an approved proctor such as an AGO officer, a teacher, or a recording engineer. The competitor is responsible for selecting the instrument and obtaining a proctor. The proctor will make four CD copies of the recording and submit them to AGO National Headquarters, postmarked not later than November 12, 2013. A field of no more than five semifinalists will be announced by February 1, 2014.

Performance Requirements

1. An improvisation on a given cantus firmus that includes a harmonization of the tune and an improvisation on the tune.

2. An improvisation on a given free theme.

Preparation time for this round: 30 minutes.

Maximum performance time: 15 minutes.

Proctor's Responsibilities

* Attend the entire recording session, with no other audience members permitted except a recording engineer.

* Make sure all recording equipment is working properly with a brief trial recording before giving the themes to the competitor.

* Receive the themes and proctor's form from the competition administrator and give them to the competitor 30 minutes before the recording session begins. The competitor may not play the organ or any other instrument after receiving the themes and before recording the improvisations.

* Ensure that the CD is high-quality, continuous, unedited, and free from background noise or other imperfections that would impair its effectiveness.

* Verify that all four CDs are properly labeled as instructed by the administrator and playable on standard playback equipment.

* Send the recordings, proctor's form, and themes to AGO Headquarters. The proctor's form will certify that the recording session was properly monitored and that the recording's quality and playability have been confirmed.

III- SEMIFINAL AND FINAL ROUNDS

All competitors must avoid the competition site outside of the appointed orientation, practice, and performance times, except for official AGO convention events. Each competitor will practice alone. Except for an NCOI Committee-approved person who may demonstrate combinations of the competitor's choice and/or provide registration assistance on instruments with no pistons, no one may listen to or accompany the competitor during practice sessions. A panel of three judges, none of whom will have served as a judge for the Preliminary Round, will serve for both the Semifinal and Final Rounds. Judges will be screened from the competitors, and no applause will be allowed. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

2014 National Competition in Organ Improvisation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.