Canadian Organized Crime Groups Forging Links with Mexican Outlaws: RCMP

By Bronskill, Jim | The Canadian Press, July 11, 2013 | Go to article overview

Canadian Organized Crime Groups Forging Links with Mexican Outlaws: RCMP


Bronskill, Jim, The Canadian Press


Canadian crime groups forge Mexican links

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OTTAWA - Canadian organized-crime groups have forged links with Mexican outlaws in an attempt to secure a direct supply of cocaine and increase their profits by eliminating the middleman, says the RCMP.

An internal analysis by the Mounties notes that since 2008 at least 10 Canadians have been shot or killed in Mexico under circumstances suggesting involvement with local criminal elements.

Some were known to be active in drug trafficking in Canada and all had extensive criminal backgrounds, says the RCMP analysis.

A copy of the May 2012 assessment, which takes a close look at the influence of corruption, and a related review of the implications for Canada -- both heavily censored -- were released to The Canadian Press under the Access to Information Act.

The Mounties say global borders have become blurred with the proliferation of transnational organized crime.

As a result, Canadian criminal networks have expanded, conducting business on an international scale with illicit organizations in other countries.

"Canadian criminal groups are now dealing directly with Mexican criminals and crime groups in Mexico, a country struggling with corruption and brutal violence," says the assessment by the RCMP's criminal intelligence program.

In April last year, Thomas Gisby, a B.C. man with known gang ties, was gunned down in a Nuevo Vallarta coffee shop. Three members of a group known as the UN Gang and two people with purported links to the Hells Angels have also been killed in Mexico.

At the same time, interceptions of Canada-bound drug shipments "point to possible connections between Mexican and Canadian-based crime networks," the RCMP says.

A recently released Canada Border Services Agency report cites Mexico as the largest transit point for South American cocaine destined for North America.

The RCMP assessment says competition among drug trafficking organizations has made corruption endemic in Mexican society, reflected in weakened governmental institutions, an ineffective criminal justice system, and a deep-rooted fear and distrust of authorities by the Mexican people. …

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