Who's Who in Labor

Labor Law Journal, Summer 2013 | Go to article overview

Who's Who in Labor


On May 28, the President forwarded to the Senate his nominations for two agency positions: Chai R. Feldblum for reappointment to the EEOC and Lafe E. Solomon to serve as NLRB General Counsel. The President nominated Feldblum for a term expiringjuly 1, 2018. She currently serves as a Commissioner with the agency, a job she has held since 2010.

The President nominated Solomon to serve officially as General Counsel of the NLRB for a term of four years, replacing Ronald Meisburg, who resigned. In January 2011, the President initially announced his intent to nominate Solomon, who has served as Acting General Counsel since June 21,2010.

On May 22, the Senate HELP Committee approved, largely along party lines, a slate of five nominees to serve as NLRB members, sending the nominations to the fall Senate for a confirmation vote, most likely in July.

Ranking Member Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn) voted for nominees Phil Miscimarra, Harry Johnson, and Chairman Mark Pearce, but he continued to oppose the nominations of Sharon Block and Richard Griffin. Despite acknowledging their qualifications, Alexander objected to the fact that the pair continued to serve in their roles after the D.C. Circuit, in NLRB ν Noel Canning, concluded their recess appointments were constitutionally invalid (and Alexander subsequently issued a call for their resignation).

Also at the NLRB, Chairman Pearce announced on April 12 the appointment of Gary Shinners as Executive Secretary. In 2010, Shinners was appointed Deputy Executive Secretary. He has served as the Agency's Acting Executive Secretary since January 2013, when former Executive Secretary Les Heltzer retired. …

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