Chronology: Egypt

The Middle East Journal, Summer 2013 | Go to article overview

Chronology: Egypt


See also Arab-Israeli Conflict, Libya, Qatar

Jan. 19: An Egyptian judge invoked a pardon issued last year by President Mohamed Morsi to acquit 379 people accused of participating in deadly Cairo street fights in November 2011, which left 42 people dead. The Ultras - soccer fans that led the riots - protested restrictions on sit-ins and the Egyptian military's failure to relinquish power. [NYT, 1/19]

Jan. 20: Egyptian police confiscated one ton of explosives found in a truck headed to the Sinai Peninsula through a traffic tunnel under the Suez Canal. [Daily Star, 1/20]

Jan. 22: The rights group Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights published a report on 16 cases of police violence in which 11 people were killed and 10 tortured inside police stations. The report stated that police still use excessive force, and that torture was still systematic, as it was under Mubarak's rule. The government refused to comment. [NYT, 1/22]

Jan. 25: On the second anniversary of Egypt's revolution, violent demonstrations in several cities killed at least seven people and left 379 injured. The violence began in the morning when police officers burned two protest tents in Tahrir Square. [Guardian, 1/25]

Jan. 26: Riots erupted in Port Said after a judge condemned 21 soccer fans from that city to death for their roles in the February 2012 soccer stadium disaster, in which swarming spectators killed 74 people. Military police in armored vehicles monitored Port Said's streets to maintain calm and stability. Upwards of 26 people died in the riots following the soccer fans' sentencing. [Haaretz, 1/26]

Jan. 28: President Morsi called for "national dialogue" with the opposition on the fourth day of spreading unrest that killed 40 and injured more than 1,000 across Egypt. Leftist opposition coalition, the National Salvation Front (NSF), rejected his proposal, demanding he acknowledge responsibility for the violence. On January 27, Morsi announced a 30-day state of emergency and imposed curfews on three cities" [NPR, 1/28]

Jan. 30: The NSF held a dialogue with the ultraconservative Nour Party on the sixth day of unrest. The two parties pushed for an end to the street violence and affirmed a shared desire to further discuss their policies. The NSF rejected President Morsi's January 28 request for a national dialogue. [WP, 1/30]

Feb. 2: Prime Minister Hisham Qandil accepted the resignation of chairman Tarek Amer from the state-owned National Bank of Egypt. Amer took his post in 2008, and the cabinet's statement conveyed that he significantly restructured the bank during his tenure, but neither party provided a complete explanation for his resignation. [Daily Star, 2/2]

Feb. 5: Iranian President Mahmud Ahmadinejad called for an alliance with Egypt and offered a loan to the financially troubled country. His visit to Cairo was the first by an Iranian leader in more than three decades. President Mohamed Morsi downplayed the importance of Ahmadinejad's visit, explaining that it was primarily for the Organization of Islamic Countries summit. [Reuters, 2/6]

Feb. 6: Fifty-seven leaders of Muslim- majority states attended the summit of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation in Egypt. The Syrian conflict was a major topic of discussion, and participants focused on how to end internal violence and resolve the conflict. Iranian president Mahmud Ahmadinejad, one of al-Asad's strongest allies, explicitly called for talks between the Syrian president and rebel forces, and said he supported continued unity within the opposition forces. [Reuters, 2/6]

Feb. 9: A Cairo court ordered Egypt's government to block access to YouTube for 30 days for hosting a video deemed offensive to Islam. The video, called "Innocence of Muslims," depicts Muhammad as a religious charlatan, pedophile, and womanizer. In September 2012, "Innocence of Muslims" caused protests in more than 20 countries, leaving more then 50 people dead. …

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