Practical Resource for Suicidal Behavior

By Pearrow, Melissa M. | National Association of School Psychologists. Communique, May 2013 | Go to article overview

Practical Resource for Suicidal Behavior


Pearrow, Melissa M., National Association of School Psychologists. Communique


Practical Resource for Suicidal Behavior CHILD AND ADOLESCENTSUICIDAL BEHAVlOR: SchoolBased Prevention, Assessment, and Intervention By David N. Miller 2011, Guilford Press

REVIEWED BY MELISSA M. PEARROW

Suicide is the third leading cause of death for youth between the ages of 10 and 24 in the United States, resulting in approximately 4400 lives lost each year (CDC, 2012). The recently released Child and Adolescent Suicidal Behavior: School-Based Prevention, Assessment, and Intervention (2011), authored by Dr. David N. Miller, is a comprehensive and practical resource that provides abroad examination of the issues underlying suicidal behavior and contextualizes prevention and postvention strategies to the school setting.

As part of the Guilford Practical Intervention in the Schools Series, this 170page dense book begins with an overview of suicidal behavior and explores the whys andmyths ofyouth suicide. It explores and identifies critical components of effective, universal, school-based prevention programs and provides an overview of a public health approach to suicide prevention. Chapters also focus on the challenges and legal and ethical issues when implementing screening programs as well as strategies for assessing risk behaviors, linking assessment to intervention, and differentiating self-injury from suicidal behavior. The final chapter presents guidelines for the school's postvention response, including communication with the family and school community and strategies for identifying those at greatest risk for contagion of this behavior. There is also a hidden bonus in the Appendix: a short chapter coauthored by two law professors examining student suicide case law in public schools.

This book serves as an important resource for school mental health professionals as it offers both depth and breadth on this worrisome topic. …

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