Our Dolls, Our Selves

By Rice, Jim | Sojourners Magazine, July 2013 | Go to article overview

Our Dolls, Our Selves


Rice, Jim, Sojourners Magazine


WHEN MY DAUGHTER, Jessica, was 7 years old, some of her best friends had American Gir! dolls, so of course she desperately needed one as well. We asked three or four family members to chip in-these were expensive dolls-and got her one for Christmas.

Her doll, "Addy," came with a story, as did each in the American Girl line. Addy and her mother had escaped from slavery in the American South, and they "followed the drinking gourd" north to Philadelphia, where they were eventually reunited with the rest of Addy's family. It was a gripping story, especially for a 7-year-old. And the fact that Addy was about my daughters age made it all the easier for her to connect.

"It wasn't so much that i learned 'facts'" about slavery and race from the Addy stories, Jessica, now 27, told me recently, "but they made it all more personal. Addy was young, like me-I could relate to it"

Other women who grew up with the dolls echoed that sense of connection with the various American Girl stories. Janelle Tupper, campaigns assistant at Sojourners, was around 7 when she received the "Kirsten" doll, a Swedish immigrant to the U.S. "My most distinct memory from the stories was that, on the boat, her best friend dies of cholera," Tupper said. "Reading that passage » was pretty devastating to me as a s kid." Other books in the American Girl series addressed issues of the day, from child labor to women's suffrage. And while Tupper said she wasn't aware as a child of the social justice themes in the stories-"i was just imagining life in the different time periods through the eyes of a character I identified with"-she now sees the series as addressing "societal change in terms that an 8-year-old can understand, often told through the characters' friendships and family stories,"

A former teacher named Pleasant Rowland created the American Girl line in 1986, inspired by a visit to Colonial Williamsburg where, she said, she was struck by "what a poor job schools do of teaching history. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Our Dolls, Our Selves
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.