Content Analysis of Introductory Interior Design College Textbooks: A Study Revisited

By Temple, Julie A.; Potthoff, Joy K. | Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences, January 1, 2013 | Go to article overview

Content Analysis of Introductory Interior Design College Textbooks: A Study Revisited


Temple, Julie A., Potthoff, Joy K., Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences


Introductory interior design texts adopted by design educators present information relevant to both historical and contemporary issues in interior design. According to one author, they provide a "survey of the field of interior design as it now exists" (Pile, 2007). A comparison of the content of contemporary texts with those of more than a decade ago (Potthoff & Woods, 1997) should reflect changes in the profession, advances in technology, and current accreditation standards; the texts also should document such important changes. Findings from the research are described and implications for design education are provided.

The purpose of this study was threefold. The first purpose was to replicate a study undertaken by Potthoff and Woods (1995), titled Content Analysis of Seven Introductory Interior Design College Texts Published between 1986 and 1994, to discover which introductory books are most frequently used by interior design educators and to review the specific topics covered in each of the selected texts and the amount of coverage on each topic. The second purpose was to examine and compare the previous (1995) and current text selection for changes in the amount of content devoted to 18 topic areas-as defined in the original study-and to reveal new topic areas. A third purpose was to review the recommendations presented by Potthoff and Woods for six topics areas to be enhanced in future editions. The six topic areas are as follows:

* Increased professionalism of interior design and emphasis on the business aspects, costs, and budgets

* Design for life span and disabilities

* Broadening the scope to include commercial as well as residential design

* Increased emphasis on safety and building codes

* Growing interest in historic interiors, preservation, and adaptive reuse

* Continuation of energy conservation ideals started in the 1970s

As evidenced by the work, authors of introductory interior design texts present information they have researched and found to be relevant to today's teaching of interior design. Content and amount of coverage may vary among authors, but the primary purpose of the text is to present historical and current information that can be applied to the student's understanding of interior design. This requires that authors remain diligent and continue to reflect the paradigm changes in their publications.

METHODOLOGY

Upon approval by the Human Subjects boards, an email was sent to members of the Interior Design Educators Council (IDEC) who were registered with an email address in the IDEC Member Center Online Directory. The message requested their volunteer participation and contained a website link to survey software at http://www.Qualtrics.com. Two follow up requests for participation were sent by email. The survey contained one open-ended question; it was programmed to collect answers anonymously as well as prevent a user from taking the survey more than once by initializing the "prevent ballot box stuffing" feature of the software. The survey question was, "Please tell us which interior design college textbooks you use in the first two semesters (introductory courses) of your program."

Following the methodology from the original study, the top texts were examined on a topic-by-topic basis using the content analysis technique designed by Holsti (1969). This technique involves creating a transparent template for each book, dividing the page layout into 10 units. The amount of text is recorded by placing the transparent template over the page and counting the amount of units of text devoted to each topic. As stated in the original study, this method is by nature, subjective, but it is believed that this system provides a fairly accurate indication of the general orientation of the text, the topics included, and the depth of coverage given to each topic. This method of analysis allows for data to be categorized in a quantitative manner, documenting the number of pages of text devoted to each of the major and subtopic categories, as determined by a review of the table of contents in each text. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Content Analysis of Introductory Interior Design College Textbooks: A Study Revisited
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.