Obama Bashing

By Cowper-Coles, Sherard | The World Today, June/July 2013 | Go to article overview

Obama Bashing


Cowper-Coles, Sherard, The World Today


Obama bashing Vali Nasr, The Dispensable Nation: American Foreign Policy in Retreat (Double day £19.00)

A Middle East expert's critique of US foreign policy is unfair, writes Sherard Cowper-Coles

Vali Nasr is a good man, but this is not a good book. In early 2009, Nasr, one of America's greatest experts on Shia Islam in general, and Iran in particular, was asked by Richard Holbrooke to join the team supporting America's new Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Nasr spent nearly two years with Holbrooke, until his untimely death, in harness, in December 2010. This book is the fruit of Nasr's time working with and for one of the greatest American diplomats of recent times.

The first, and better, half of the book is a partial account of Nasr's rollercoaster ride in the 'creative chaos' of Holbrooke's SRAP shop, squeezed into a suite of offices beside the State Department canteen. Much of this rings true.

Nasr paints a persuasive picture of Holbrooke's anarchic style, of his conviction that, on its own, a military- heavy strategy could not work (as Holbrooke knew from his time as a junior diplomat working in and on Vietnam), and of the good relations between Holbrooke and Hillary Clinton, US Secretary of State at the time.

Where this part of the book strains credulity, however, is in its Manichean depiction of Holbrooke and Clinton as all good, and of Obama and the White House team as all bad.

Even Holbrooke's greatest admirers - of whom I count myself one - knew that he had faults, of egoism and insensitivity to others that alienated important potential allies in Washington, Kabul and beyond. If Clinton had backed Holbrooke rather than the generals in the dispute over whether to fight and then talk, or do both at the same time, Obama might well have felt obliged to come down on the right side.

The two chapters Nasr devotes to Afghanistan, followed by one each on Pakistan and Iran, offer plenty of genuine insights about the Obama administration's fumbling conduct of what the presidential candidate had called 'the good war'. …

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