Around the Country

Natural History, July/August 2013 | Go to article overview

Around the Country


ARIZONA

Mesa

ARIZONA MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

Ongoing: "Rulers of the Prehistoric Skies." Meet the pterosaurs, the largest animals that have ever flown, in this new exhibition examining the winged reptiles that lived from 225 to 65 million years ago. Find out about the Quetzalcoatlus northropi and its 39-foot wingspan, the fish-eating Nyctosaurus, the toothed Dsungaripterus, and many other animals that were neither birds nor dinosaurs.

53 North Macdonald

480-644-2230

www.azmnh.org

Phoenix

ARIZONA SCIENCE CENTER

Ongoing: "Forces of Nature." Experience some of the raw power generated by a dynamic Earth, including phenomena such as earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes, volcanic eruptions, and wildfires. Find out what Earth scientists do and what their work reveals. The Immersion Theater puts you in the center of the action, and hands-on exhibits help explain the underlying science of plate tectonics, ocean currents, wind patterns, and more.

600 East Washington Street

602-716-2000

www.azscience.org ®

CALIFORNIA

Los Angeles

NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM OF LOS ANGELES COUNTY

Ongoing: "Dinosaur Hall." Get up close to the terrible lizards in this gallery featuring more than 300 fossils and 20 complete mounts of dinosaurs and sea creatures. Stroll beneath a 68-foot Mamenchisaurus, see the world's only display of differently aged T. rex specimens (baby, juvenile, and sub-adult), see the preserved remains of a dinosaur's last meal, and more.

Exposition Park

900 Exposition Boulevard

213-763-DINO

www.nhm.org (5)

San Diego

SAN DIEGO NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM

Through November 11: "Mammoths and Mastodons: Titans of the Ice Age." Walk with the giants in this exhibition featuring fossil tusks and skulls, many hands-on activities, and life-size models of the prehistoric animals. Discover what scientists are learning about the evolution of mammoths and their contemporary elephant relatives through new discoveries, including a wellpreserved Siberian baby mammoth specimen found in 2007.

Balboa Park

1788 El Prado

619-232-3821

www.sdnhm.org ®

COLORADO

Denver

DENVER MUSEUM OF NATURE AND SCIENCE

Ongoing: "North American Indian Cultures." Explore how different environments and materials influenced life among the continent's native peoples... and how they continue to do so. Step into a Cheyenne tipi, an Eskimo snow house, and a Navajo hogan; examine different weavings, basketry, beadwork, and pottery; and hear stories about how different groups have met needs for food, clothing, transportation, and more.

2001 Colorado Boulevard

303-370-6000

www.dmns.org φ

CONNECTICUT

New Haven

PEABODY MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

Through January 4, 2014: "Echoes of Egypt: Conjuring the Land of the Pharaohs." Find out how the pharaonic Egyptian culture that last flourished thousands of years ago continued to influence the world for centuries, including our contemporary period. Explore the meaning and changing uses of hieroglyphs, see mummies and funerary objects, and discover how people around the world have incorporated Egyptian themes into their art, architecture, literature, and philosophy.

Yale University

170 Whitney Avenue

203-432-5050

www.peabody.yale.edu

DELAWARE

Wilmington

DELAWARE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

Through September 2: "Water's Extreme Journey." Find out about watersheds and their inhabitants in this exhibition developed with Wyland, the marine-life artist. Just like a raindrop, you can wind your way through lakes, rivers, wetlands, and other bodies of water. Along the way, find out about pollutants that come from agriculture, homes, litter, and other sources.

4840 Kennett Pike

302-658-9111

www.delmnh.org

FLORIDA

Gainesville

FLORIDA MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

Ongoing: "Butterfly Rainforest. …

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