What Are You Reading?: Books

The Times Higher Education Supplement : THE, August 1, 2013 | Go to article overview

What Are You Reading?: Books


A weekly look over the shoulders of our scholar-reviewers.

Megan Crawford, reader in the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge, is reading Neil Gaiman's The Ocean at the End of the Lane (Headline, 2013). "I like fantasy fiction, but for some reason have never got around to reading Gaiman until now. His latest is a tale woven around the nature of memory, magic and the bonds of friendship, with Gaiman using his child heroine to move from cosy family to terror in the dark. The writing is evocative and informed by fairy tale, with the porridge and honey in the Hempstocks' kitchen conjuring up childhood desires just as Turkish delight does in Narnia. Impressed, I am plundering his back catalogue for my summer reading."

Clare Debenham, lecturer in politics, University of Manchester, is reading Andrei Lankov's The Real North Korea (Oxford University Press, 2013). "Before reading this book I saw North Korea in a set of stereotypes: an unstable regime using possession of nuclear weapons as a threat, beset by famine and ruled by an overweight young man with a strange haircut. Lankov offers a nuanced picture of this secretive country, drawing on his own experience and the North Koreans he has interviewed. He argues that the standard of living has rapidly risen in some classes and its leaders' actions have their own logic. Crucially he addresses the question of why North and South Korea have not reunified."

David Kennedy, senior lecturer in English and creative writing at the University of Hull, is reading Jane Thomas' Thomas Hardy and Desire: Conceptions of the Self (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

What Are You Reading?: Books
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.