Queer Lit

By Carter, Monica | World Literature Today, September/October 2013 | Go to article overview

Queer Lit


Carter, Monica, World Literature Today


WHAT TO READ NOW

The importance of LGBT rights has been a prominent social and political lightning rod for decades. Today it is at the forefront of our politics, our history, and our culture. During this year alone, two of the worlds largest powers made politi- cal decisions that represent conflict- ing views on LGBT rights: the US Supreme Court reversed DOMA and effectively ended Prop 8 to make same-sex marriage legal, while Russia implemented a law that criminalizes homosexuality. The politics of homo- sexuality are as contentious as ever and the way governments address them more divisive than ever.

LGBT literature reflects the ebb and flow of this acceptance and condemnation. For centuries, homo- sexual literature has been banned, hidden, and destroyed. These novels are examples of political rebellion and the power of the written word. Whether allowed to be heard freely or quieted by a culture of repression, these shouts and whispers are the voices of our community. Without apology, these novels demonstrate that we are taking our place in soci- ety with bravery and honesty.

Lyric Novella

Annemarie Schwarzenbach

Isabel Cole, tr.

This is the quintessential love story of lesbian falls for straight girl-only the narrator is a thinly disguised male version of the author, and it was published in 1933 Berlin. It is also an important societal and historical novella about a woman in love/lust with another woman during a time when homophobia was on the rise in nascent Nazi Germany. Schwarzen- bach, who was Swiss, lived a lesbian, bohemian lifestyle during a difficult time, and this novella captures the desperation of the lovesick.

The Diesel

Thani Al-Suwaidi

William Maynard Hutchins, tr.

Originally published in Beirut in 1994, The Diesel was banned and didn't appear in English until recent- ly. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Queer Lit
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.