A Phone Call from Dalian/Doubled Shadows

By Stenberg, Josh | World Literature Today, September/October 2013 | Go to article overview

A Phone Call from Dalian/Doubled Shadows


Stenberg, Josh, World Literature Today


Han Dong. A Phone Call from Dalian. Nicky Harman et al., ed. Brookline, Massachusetts / Hong Kong. Zephyr / Chinese University Press of Hong Kong. 2012. isbn 9780983297017

Ouyang Jianghe. Doubled Shadows. Austin Woerner, tr. Brookline, Massachusetts / Hong Kong. Zephyr/ Chinese University Press of Hong Kong. 2012. isbn 978- 0981552170

Ouyang Jianghe and Han Dong are near contemporaries, and both occupy established places in what, for over thirty years, has been known as avant-garde Chinese literature. In poetic approach, they represent diver- gent tendencies-Ouyang cosmopol- itan, clean, and heavily referential; Han craftily offhand, personal, con- fidently bizarre, not tetchy about grime or sex. Where Ouyang often seems to offer an argument about the cultural currents and skirmishes of today's China, Han's work most often reads as a lament for the fail- ure of attempts to bridge the spaces between people-what Maghiel van Crevel's introduction calls a "skepti- cism regarding human contact and communication." Editor Nicky Har- man wishes to lay emphasis on the diversity of Han Dong's creation, including his newer, lesser-known works. This point is valid, but Han's strongest pieces-and they can stand their ground in any contemporary world literary canon-remain those that cut to the bone with some cas- ual cruelty or ironic insertion, with a wrenching revelation or lurch- ing image. The six translators fea- tured here produce generally superb work, with perhaps a quibble about an occasional error ("a cool Jesus" appearing for "looks just like Jesus"; Shandong being located in the "Northeast") or the tendency to ele- vate Han's register (e.g. "while an event unfolds" is rendered for "when something happens").

Ouyang's aesthetic musings, philosophical meditations, or social critiques are always thought-pro- voking and often amusing. Of all contemporary Chinese poets, he is perhaps the most widely allusive, with his natural range of influen- ces running from China's classical philosophy through the contem- porary US. Rendering Ouyang into English is a complex matter, as Aus- tin Woerner explains in an entertain- ing translator's introduction. Laying out his process and strategies, he forestalls criticism by remarking that "alert bilingual readers" will "some- times find small pieces of Ouyang missing, or bits of me still lodged in the masonry. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

A Phone Call from Dalian/Doubled Shadows
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.