Pre-Admission Factors and Utilization of Tutoring Services in Health Professions Educational Programs

By Olivares-Urueta, Mayra; Williamson, Jon W. | Journal of Allied Health, Summer 2013 | Go to article overview

Pre-Admission Factors and Utilization of Tutoring Services in Health Professions Educational Programs


Olivares-Urueta, Mayra, Williamson, Jon W., Journal of Allied Health


Pre-admission factors tend to serve as indicators of student success in health professions educational programs, but less is known about the effects that academic assistance programs have on student success. This study sought to determine whether specific pre-admission factors could help to identify students who may require academic support during their health professions education. This retrospective analysis aimed to identify differences in pre-admission variables between those students requiring tutoring and a matched sample of students who did not require tutoring. One-way ANOVA was used to assess differences for dependent variables-age, cumulative GPA (cGPA), science GPA (sGPA), verbal graduate record examination (GRE) score, quantitative GRE score, analytical GRE score and combined GRE score, community college hours, average credit hours per semester, and highest semester credit hour load-across three groups of students who received no tutoring (NT 0 hrs), some tutoring (ST <8 hrs), and more tutoring (MT >8 hrs). Total GRE and average semester hours differentiated NT from ST from MT (p<0.05). A linear regression model with these pre-admission factors found only four of the independent variables to be significant (r2=0.41; p<0.05) in predicting hours of tutoring: quantitative GRE, sGPA, cGPA and average semester hours taken. The combination of lower GRE scores and lighter average semester course load were most predictive of the need for academic assistance as defined by hours of tutoring. While the value of the GRE in admissions processes is generally accepted, the average semester hour load in college can also provide important information regarding academic preparation and the need for tutoring services. J Allied Health 2013; 42(2):74-78.

THE USE of quantitative pre-admission data to predict academic performance or success has been extensively investigated and reviewed,1 however, the potential involvement of academic support services as a component of student academic success has typically not been addressed in these discussions. In the search for predictors of academic success, studies have more commonly examined pre-admission factors as they relate to first-year or post-program grade point average (GPA) as a measure of success.1-6 Generally these specific pre-admission factors have included cumulative GPA (cGPA), science GPA (sGPA), graduate record examination (GRE) scores, and GRE sub-scores4,6,7 as well as the selectivity or academic rigor of prior institutions attended.5,8,9 From these findings, one can make a strong case that prior academic success is a good indicator of the potential for future academic success. However, a factor not often considered is the role of academic support services (e.g., tutoring) as a possible contributing factor in a student's academic success in health professions programs.

A systematic review by Santee and Garavalia (2006)10 suggested that tutoring programs can be effective and have a positive impact on academic performance. The tutoring program at our institution has been highly successful in assisting students with academic difficulty and sustaining high graduation rates of 96%. However, questions have been raised as to the effectiveness of these programs in relation to the resources expended and numbers of students served.10,11 While it has been reported that only a small percentage of students have difficulty graduating, these students may still require a significant amount of institutional resources.13 Given this scenario, we were interested in determining whether there may be specific pre-admission factors that could help identify students, within these more academically competitive cohorts admitted to graduate level health professions programs, who may require tutoring services.

The relationship between pre-admission data and utilization of academic assistance support services has not been directly investigated to our knowledge. In a study conducted by Jewell and Riddle (2005),4 both GPA and verbal GRE scores had predictive value in assessing a student's likelihood of academic probation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Pre-Admission Factors and Utilization of Tutoring Services in Health Professions Educational Programs
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.