Fresh Focus on Canadian Milestones Stokes Fear Conservatives Rewriting History

By Goodman, Lee-Anne | The Canadian Press, October 16, 2013 | Go to article overview

Fresh Focus on Canadian Milestones Stokes Fear Conservatives Rewriting History


Goodman, Lee-Anne, The Canadian Press


Is government trying to reshape Cdn history?

--

OTTAWA - The Conservative government's focus on a series of upcoming national milestones has stoked fears that the Tories are trying to put a stop to what it considers a liberal-lensed perspective on Canadian history.

Wednesday's throne speech highlighted the government's plans to celebrate the 150th anniversary of Confederation in 2017, the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War, the 75th anniversary of the beginning of the Second World War and to mark the end of Canada's Afghanistan mission by honouring those who "made the ultimate sacrifice combating the spread of terrorism."

"From the founding of New France, to the fight for Canada in the War of 1812; from the visionary achievement of Confederation, to our victory at Vimy Ridge, Canadians have repeatedly triumphed over long odds to forge a great country, united and free," said Gov. Gen. David Johnston.

The speech also said the government intends to "honour the proud history of our Canadian Armed Forces by restoring our military traditions."

The Tories have already announced their intent to resurrect Canadian Army rank insignia, names and badges to traditional uniforms and have reinserted the word "royal" into the titles of Canada's military institutions.

Some historians have complained bitterly that the Conservatives have been paying short shrift to Canada's social, medical and technological history in favour of unduly emphasizing the country's military triumphs.

"What I find really unsettling about this government is that they are forcing a view of Canada on the country that most Canadians don't accept," said Ian McKay, a history professor at Queen's University in Kingston, Ont.

"It's the transformation of history into myth, a romanticizing of our military history. It's hyper-militarism, very authoritarian, and it represents an aggressive attack on Canada's peacekeeping tradition."

But Jack Granatstein, a historian who has long advocated a greater emphasis on Canadian military history, dismissed such concerns as "nonsense." Indeed, Granatstein said he's worried the Tories are going to skimp on the First World War in their plans to celebrate Canada's military history.

"I am told they're only putting in as much money for World War One as they did for the War of 1812, about $30 million or something, and that's just pathetic," Granatstein said.

"This was a world-changing event in which Canadians played an absolutely major role and it needs to be commemorated in a big way."

Granatstein conceded, however, that he could "see some of the difficulties" for the government in commemorating the First World War.

"Quebec basically opted out of the war, and it's pretty hard to paint it any other way, and it would be a bit difficult for the government to paint it as a great national experience when a third of the country opted out. But in English-speaking Canada, this was a huge event with major social ramifications as well."

Granatstein, who once headed up the Canadian War Museum, also scoffed at complaints from McKay and other historians -- including those at the Canadian History Association -- about the government's laser-sharp focus on Canada's military history.

"It's ignorance, it's stupidity, and it's been my view that it's complete nonsense," he said.

"Obviously I am generalizing, but historians are all NDPers, they hate the Tories with a passion, and they're all social historians, so they think any government that's going to commemorate the War of 1812 -- which they have all said is unimportant, which is just silly -- is a war-mongering government. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Fresh Focus on Canadian Milestones Stokes Fear Conservatives Rewriting History
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.