Challenging Images of Women in the Media: Reinventing Womens Lives

By Beasley, Maurine H. | Journalism History, Fall 2013 | Go to article overview

Challenging Images of Women in the Media: Reinventing Womens Lives


Beasley, Maurine H., Journalism History


Carilli, Theresa, and Jane Campbell, eds. Challenging Images of Women in the Media: Reinventing Women's Lives. Lanham, Md.: Lexington Books, 2012. 199 pp. $65 hardback; $32.99 paperback and eBook.

This slender volume contains fifteen well-executed essays that critique mass media's treatment of women by contending it offers a series of confused, if not harmful, messages pertaining to gender. In a brief introduction the editors say that women worldwide remain confronted by media portrayals that frequently present them as commodities in a global culture driven by profit-seeking. The editors begin with a brief overview that one wishes were longer, particularly in view of its chief assertion that media portrayals generally are becoming worse rather than better. The most positive note comes in a short commentary by Carilli that ends the book. It calls attention to the careers of three lesbian comediennes, Rosie O'Donnell, Ellen DeGeneres, and Jane Lynch, who are credited with helping diminish homophobia by presenting lesbians as likable, normal individuals.

With its contents divided into five sections-Reinscribing Women's Roles, Political Issues, Westernizing Women, Political Individuals and Reflective Essays-the volume presents feminist research utilizing a variety of methodologies including textual and discourse analysis. Individual authors are identified in brief biographies as professors of communication and Ph.D. students. More than half of the essays deal with depictions of women outside the United States.

The book's spectrum ranges widely across media. There is a study of dieting women in Special K advertisements that the authors find instill a diminished sense of feminine self-worth. Another essay analyzes an online campaign in India to send pink Chaddi (panties) to the head of a moral policing group that claimed responsibility for attacks on young women partying inside a pub. As is often the case with an edited volume, some of the essays provide more trenchant commentary than others, but taken as a whole they make the point that women continue to be treated differently and less advantageously than men in the media.

While taking note of women's progress in the last half-century, the essays provide convincing evidence of subtle or not-so-subtle gender discrimination in contemporary media even though women in principle have achieved legal equality with men. Its global scope gives a somewhat miscellaneous character to the work, but this is offset by the strength of the international material. It includes studies of women in historical dramas on Japanese television, which glorify fictional, servile roles, as well as scrutiny of the covers of China's most influential women's magazine, Women of China, which promotes gendered consumption for the privileged. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Challenging Images of Women in the Media: Reinventing Womens Lives
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.