"Sisters, Mothers, Daughters and Aunties": HIV Vaccine Acceptability among African, Caribbean and Other Black Women in Toronto

By Weaver, James; Newman, Peter A. et al. | Canadian Journal of Public Health, September/October 2013 | Go to article overview

"Sisters, Mothers, Daughters and Aunties": HIV Vaccine Acceptability among African, Caribbean and Other Black Women in Toronto


Weaver, James, Newman, Peter A., Williams, Charmaine C., Massaquoi, Notisha, Brown, Marsha, Canadian Journal of Public Health


ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Black women in Canada are at disproportionately high risk for HIV. We assessed HIV vaccine acceptability and correlates of acceptability among Black women from African and Caribbean communities in Toronto.

METHODS: "Sisters, Daughters, Mothers, and Aunties" was a community-based research project. Black women of African and Caribbean descent were recruited using venue-based sampling across diverse community organizations in Toronto. We used a structured questionnaire to collect data on sociodemographic characteristics and acceptability of 8 future HIV vaccines, each defined by a set of 7 dichotomous attributes. Conjoint analysis was used to quantify the relative impact of vaccine attributes on acceptability, with multiple regression to adjust for socio-demographic characteristics associated with overall acceptability.

RESULTS: Mean vaccine acceptability was 58.8 (SD=17.2) on the 100-point scale. Efficacy had the greatest impact on acceptability, followed by side effects, cost, duration of protection, and number of doses. Acceptability of a high (99%) efficacy vaccine (70.1/100) was significantly greater than for a 50% efficacy vaccine (47.6/100). Vaccine acceptability was significantly higher among women of Caribbean versus African descent, ever married versus single women, and women with full-time versus part-time employment.

CONCLUSIONS: Black women in Toronto indicated a modest level of acceptability for future HIV vaccines. Educational interventions that address the benefits of partially efficacious vaccines and clearly explain potential side effects, as well as vaccine cost subsidies may promote HIV vaccine uptake. Differences in acceptability within Black communities suggest that tailored multi-level interventions may mitigate barriers to uptake.

KEY WORDS: AIDS vaccines; acceptability of healthcare; conjoint analysis; African, Caribbean and other Black women; Canada

La traduction du résumé se trouve à la fin de l'article. Can J Public Health 2013;104(5):e413-e417.

RÉSUMÉ

OBJECTIFS : Le risque de contracter le VIH est démesurément plus élevé chez les femmes noires au Canada. Nous avons évalué l'acceptabilité des vaccins anti-VIH et les corrélats de cette acceptabilité chez les femmes noires des communautés africaines et caribéennes de Toronto.

MÉTHODE : « Sisters, Daughters, Mothers, and Aunties » est le nom d'un projet de recherche communautaire. Des femmes noires d'ascendance africaine et caribéenne ont été recrutées par échantillonnage dans les lieux de rencontre de divers organismes communautaires de Toronto. Nous avons utilisé un questionnaire structuré pour recueillir des données sur les caractéristiques sociodémographiques et l'acceptabilité de huit futurs vaccins anti-VIH, chacun étant défini par un ensemble de sept attributs dichotomiques. Une analyse conjointe a servi à chiffrer l'impact relatif des attributs des vaccins sur leur acceptabilité, et nous avons fait appel à la régression multiple pour tenir compte des caractéristiques sociodémographiques associées à leur acceptabilité globale.

RÉSULTATS : L'acceptabilité moyenne des vaccins était de 58,8 (écarttype de 17,2) sur une échelle de 100 points. L'efficacité potentielle du vaccin avait le plus grand impact sur son acceptabilité, suivie par ses effets secondaires, son coût, sa durée de la protection et son nombre de doses. L'acceptabilité d'un vaccin à haute (99 %) efficacité potentielle était significativement plus élevée (70,1/100) que celle d'un vaccin à l'efficacité potentielle de 50 % (47,6/100). L'acceptabilité des vaccins était significativement plus élevée chez les femmes d'origine caribéenne que chez celles d'origine africaine, chez les femmes ayant été mariées que chez les célibataires, et chez les femmes ayant un emploi à plein temps plutôt qu'un emploi à temps partiel.

CONCLUSIONS : Le niveau d'acceptation des futurs vaccins anti-VIH par les femmes noires de Toronto est modeste. …

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