Acting as Global Citizens: A Challenge to U.S. Colleges and Universities

By Green, Madeleine | International Educator, November/December 2013 | Go to article overview

Acting as Global Citizens: A Challenge to U.S. Colleges and Universities


Green, Madeleine, International Educator


HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS in the United States are increasingly using the language of "global citizenship" to describe the skills and habits they seek to cultivate in their students. The journey to global citizenship frequently focuses on the exploration of personal and social responsibility in the context of an interconnected world. In an earlier article for NAFSA's Trends & Insights series, I noted the variety of ways global citizenship can be interpreted: (1) as a choice and way of thinking; (2) as self-awareness and awareness of others; (3) as the practice of cultural empathy; (4) as the cultivation of principled decision making; and (5) as participation in the social and political life of ones community. Institutions can be proud indeed if they are succeeding in cultivating these worthy habits of mind in their students.

But shouldn't colleges and universities be models for global citizens as well? According to the International Association of Universities (IAU) and the growing global conversation around "rethinking internationalization," the answer is yes. Colleges and universities are part of a global system of higher education, in which their actions matter and have an impact on others. In "Affirming Academic Values in Internationalization of Higher Education: A Call to Action," a recent statement and call to action, IAU points not only to the widely agreed-upon benefits of internationalization, but also to warn of the possible adverse consequences that are increasingly apparent as internationalization efforts mature and intensify in the context of increased globalization. Such potential negative aspects and those already visible include the dominance of English at the cost of linguistic diversity; the pursuit of the single model of excellence of the "world-class university" at the cost of differentiated institutional missions and potentially unwise investments; brain drain; questionable practices in recruiting and the challenges of providing a quality experience for international students; unevenly shared institutional benefits of internationalization; and the pursuit of international reputation and resources at the expense of academic values. IAU calls on higher education institutions to affirm academic and socially responsible values and goals that underpin their internationalization efforts, and asks institutions everywhere to "act as responsible global citizens, committed to help shape a global system of higher education that values academic integrity, quality, equitable access, and reciprocity!'

In "Higher Education Internationalization: Seeking a New Balance of Values," a 2012 NAFSA Trends & Insights essay, IAU Secretary-General Eva EgronPolak elaborated on the values affirmed in the call to action. While no one in higher education would argue with these ethical values and morally sound principles, it is always easier to affirm values than to operationalize them. So what does this call to action mean concretely for institutions as they engage with the world? Below are several questions to guide reflection as institutions seek to live by their principles.

To what extent do our practices in recruiting and providing a positive educational and social experience for international students align with the values and principles we articulate?

The race to recruit international students is a global one. In the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australia, the drive for revenue has put intense pressure on institutions to diversify their sources of income, with international student recruitment figuring prominently among them. At the same time, institutions are sincere in pointing to the contribution of international students to increasing the diversity and intellectual vibrancy of the campus. We like to think that this reason is paramount, but the pressures of prestige and income are powerful and the dangers of their pursuit are well-known. The use of recruiting agents is controversial, and at the very least, they must be carefully chosen and supervised. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Acting as Global Citizens: A Challenge to U.S. Colleges and Universities
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.