Prospective Science Teachers' Self-Efficacy Beliefs about Teaching Science between 6-8 Terms and the Opinions on These Beliefs

By Önen, Fatma; Kaygisiz, Gülfem Muslu | Kuram ve Uygulamada Egitim Bilimleri, Autumn 2013 | Go to article overview

Prospective Science Teachers' Self-Efficacy Beliefs about Teaching Science between 6-8 Terms and the Opinions on These Beliefs


Önen, Fatma, Kaygisiz, Gülfem Muslu, Kuram ve Uygulamada Egitim Bilimleri


Abstract

The formal educational institutions and the society have an important function in acquiring a sense of self-efficacy. Teachers play a role in the formal educational process. The purpose of the study is to examine prospective science teachers' self-efficacy belief level in the 6th to 8th terms and the differences in this process. This survey model study was applied in the spring semester of 2009-2010,the fall and spring semesters of the academic year 2010-2011. 40 prospective science teachers, from Marmara University Primary Science Education Department, participated in the study for three semesters. The data was collected by science teaching self-efficacy belief scale, interview questions and video recordings. The data of the scale was analyzed with paired sampled t-test and the descriptive statistical technique. Interview questions were analyzed by open-coding, and the results were interpreted in tables. According to the findings, participants' self-efficacious for science teaching is usually "good"; and it is determined from this context they found themselves quite efficient to teach science. Besides, prospective science teachers have a positive attitude towards the lessons which offer opportunity to practice. The practical lessons are highly significant for the prospective science teachers' self-efficacy beliefs.

Key Words

Science Education Self-efficacy Belief, Personal Self-efficacy in Science Teaching, Result Expectation in Science Teaching, Prospective Teacher, Science Education.

Human behavior depends on the people's self-consciousness of their capacity rather than their ability to do things (Kurbanoglu, 2004). Thus, the difference between having ability and using it properly in different situations is related to self-efficacy. Selfefficacy came into prominence when Bandura (1986) put forward that behaviors are related to confidence. Being conscious about one's self-efficacy and developing this ability enable people to work more effectively and efficiently (Özgen & Bindak, 2008), to endeavor and spend more time on their work (Akkoyunlu & Orhan, 2003), to accomplish results faster (Izgar & Dilmaç, 2008) and to work more productively and easily when faced with challenging tasks (Yilmaz, Yilmaz, & Türk, 2010). Although every teacher encounters similar problems, some of them have more positive attitudes towards these obstacles (Çapri & Kan, 2006). It is thought that this may be related to the teachers' self-efficacy.

Teachers' perception of self-efficacy regarding science teaching is related to their beliefs about their ability to teach science effectively and efficiently, and their ability to increase students' success (Akbas & Çelikkaleli, 2006). Science lessons have a crucial role in the development of self-efficacy (Çoban & Sanalan, 2002).

Research has shown that teachers with high self-efficacy use various teaching strategies (Koray, 2003; Riggs & Enochs, 1990), develop teaching materials considering individual differences (Yilmaz & Çimen, 2008) and develop their teaching experiences (Brand & Wilkins, 2007; Pajares, 1992; Smylie, 1988 as cited in Pajares, 1996). This situation affects students' achievement and motivation significantly (Martin, 2006). Many studies related to teacher selfefficacy can be found in Turkey (Akkoyunlu, Orhan, & Umay, 2005; Aktag & Walter, 2005; Aydin & Boz, 2010; Azar, 2010; Bozdogan & Öztürk, 2008; Çapri & Çelikkaleli, 2008; Çelikkaleli & Akbas, 2007; Dede, 2008; Ekinci Vural & Hamurcu, 2008; Erdem, Yilmaz, & Akkoyunlu, 2008; Meriç & Ersoy, 2007; Üredi & Üredi, 2006; Yenilmez & Kakmaci, 2008) and it is seen that research on science teaching and self-efficacy focus on different descriptive variables (Çoban & Sanalan, 2002; Önen & Öztuna, 2005; Üredi & Üredi, 2006).

It is vitally important to find out and apply the approaches, observing them that increase teacher self-efficacy since it has an important role in student success (Cantrell, Young & Moore, 2003; Chester & Beaudin, 1996; Gibson & Dembo, 1984; Karaduman & Emrahoglu, 2011; Özdemir, 2008; Öztürk, 2008; Tschannen-Moran, Woolfolk Hoy, & Hoy, 1998). …

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