Museum Sets Daily Attendance Record and Participates in Financial Literacy Program with NFL Players

By Cowen, David J. | Financial History, Summer 2013 | Go to article overview

Museum Sets Daily Attendance Record and Participates in Financial Literacy Program with NFL Players


Cowen, David J., Financial History


Message to Members

In the last issue of Financial History, I mentioned it is our dream to make admis- sion to the Museum free, as our atten- dance numbers generally double when there is no charge. The past three months have proven that statistic to be incorrect. We have learned that when we are consis- tently open for free the word gets out, and our Saturday attendance numbers have quadrupled since we instituted the free Saturday program, sponsored by South- port Lane, in May. On a recent Saturday we set a single day attendance record, with more than 500 visitors. Building on the success of that program, another firm, R.W. Pressprich, has underwritten free admission for students every weekday this summer. We thank our newest board member, Ed Rappa, CEO of Pressprich, for enabling students of all ages to come and see the value of finance to the building of America.

Another recent highlight of our finan- cial literacy efforts came when seven cur- rent and former NFL players toured the Museum and spoke with middle school students from Bloomfield, NJ about the value of education and the importance of developing personal finance skills. The players, which included Pro-Bowlers and Super Bowl winners, are enrolled in an executive MBA program, called STAR EMBA, at the George Washington Uni- versity School of Business.

In June, we hosted the leadership of museums from 12 countries for the inau- gural meeting of the International Federa- tion of Finance Museums (see article, page 5). The federation, the first of its kind for finance museums, will focus on financial lit- eracy and best practices among the member museums. The cutting edge research in financial literacy is coming out of the Global Financial Literacy Excellence Center in Washington, led by Professor Annamaria Lusardi. At the inaugural meeting in June, Anna and I were selected as co-chairs of the organization, and we look forward our next meeting in China in 2014. …

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